23 Managing SQL Tuning Sets

You can use SQL tuning sets to group statements and related metadata into a single object, which you can use as input to SQL tuning tools.

This chapter contains the following topics:

23.1 About SQL Tuning Sets

A SQL tuning set (STS) is a database object that you can use as input to tuning tools.

The database stores SQL tuning sets in a database-provided schema. An STS includes:

  • A set of SQL statements

  • Associated execution context, such as user schema, application module name and action, list of bind values, and the environment for SQL compilation of the cursor

  • Associated basic execution statistics, such as elapsed time, CPU time, buffer gets, disk reads, rows processed, cursor fetches, the number of executions, the number of complete executions, optimizer cost, and the command type

  • Associated execution plans and row source statistics for each SQL statement (optional)

Note:

Data visibility and privilege requirements may differ when using an STS with pluggable databases. See Oracle Database Administrator’s Guide for a table that summarizes how manageability features work in a container database (CDB).

This section contains the following topics:

23.1.1 Purpose of SQL Tuning Sets

An STS enables you to group SQL statements and related metadata in a single database object, which you can use to meet your tuning goals.

Specifically, SQL tuning sets achieve the following goals:

  • Providing input to the performance tuning advisors

    You can use an STS as input to multiple database advisors, including SQL Tuning Advisor, SQL Access Advisor, and SQL Performance Analyzer.

  • Transporting SQL between databases

    You can export SQL tuning sets from one database to another, enabling transfer of SQL workloads between databases for remote performance diagnostics and tuning. When suboptimally performing SQL statements occur on a production database, developers may not want to investigate and tune directly on the production database. The DBA can transport the problematic SQL statements to a test database where the developers can safely analyze and tune them.

23.1.2 Concepts for SQL Tuning Sets

To create an STS, you must load SQL statements into an STS from a source.

As shown in Figure 23-1, the source can be Automatic Workload Repository (AWR), the shared SQL area, customized SQL provided by the user, trace files, or another STS.

SQL tuning sets can do the following:

  • Filter SQL statements using the application module name and action, or any execution statistics

  • Rank SQL statements based on any combination of execution statistics

  • Serve as input to the advisors or transport it to a different database

See Also:

Oracle Database Performance Tuning Guide to learn about AWR

23.1.3 User Interfaces for SQL Tuning Sets

You can use either Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control (Cloud Control) or PL/SQL packages to manage SQL tuning sets. Oracle recommends Cloud Control.

This section contains the following topics:

23.1.3.1 Accessing the SQL Tuning Sets Page in Cloud Control

The SQL Tuning Sets page in Cloud Control is the starting page from which you can perform most operations relating to SQL tuning sets.

To access the SQL Tuning Sets page:

  1. Log in to Cloud Control with the appropriate credentials.

  2. Under the Targets menu, select Databases.

  3. In the list of database targets, select the target for the Oracle Database instance that you want to administer.

  4. If prompted for database credentials, then enter the minimum credentials necessary for the tasks you intend to perform.

  5. From the Performance menu, select SQL, then SQL Tuning Sets.

    The SQL Tuning Sets page appears, as shown in Figure 23-2.

23.1.3.2 Command-Line Interface to SQL Tuning Sets

On the command line, you can use the DBMS_SQLTUNE or DBMS_SQLSET packages to manage SQL tuning sets.

You must have the ADMINISTER SQL TUNING SET system privilege to manage SQL tuning sets that you own, or the ADMINISTER ANY SQL TUNING SET system privilege to manage any SQL tuning sets.

The traditional package for managing SQL tuning sets is DBMS_SQLTUNE, which requires the Oracle Tuning Pack. Starting in Oracle Database 18c, you can perform the same tasks with DBMS_SQLSET, which does not require the Oracle Tuning Pack. In most cases, the name of the subprogram in DBMS_SQLSET is identical to the name of the equivalent subprogram in DBMS_SQLTUNE. The following table shows only the subprograms whose names differ.

Table 23-1 Naming Differences for SQL Tuning Set Subprograms

DBMS_SQLTUNE DBMS_SQLSET
ADD_SQLSET_REFERENCE ADD_REFERENCE
CAPTURE_CURSOR_CACHE_SQLSET CAPTURE_CURSOR_CACHE
CREATE_STGTAB_SQLSET CREATE_STGTAB
PACK_STGTAB_SQLSET PACK_STGTAB
REMAP_STGTAB_SQLSET REMAP_STGTAB
REVOVE_SQLSET_REFERENCE REMOVE_REFERENCE
UNPACK_STGTAB_SQLSET UNPACK_STGTAB

See Also:

Oracle Database PL/SQL Packages and Types Reference to learn about DBMS_SQLTUNE and DBMS_SQLSET

23.1.4 Basic Tasks for Managing SQL Tuning Sets

You can use DBMS_SQLTUNE or DBMS_SQLSET to create, use, and delete SQL tuning sets. In most cases, the relevant subprograms in these packages have identical names.

The following graphic shows the basic workflow.

Figure 23-3 SQL Tuning Sets APIs

Description of Figure 23-3 follows
Description of "Figure 23-3 SQL Tuning Sets APIs"

Typically, you perform STS operations in the following sequence:

  1. Create a new STS.

    "Creating a SQL Tuning Set Using CREATE_SQLSET" describes this task.

  2. Load the STS with SQL statements and associated metadata.

    "Loading a SQL Tuning Set Using LOAD_SQLSET" describes this task.

  3. Optionally, display the contents of the STS.

    "Querying a SQL Tuning Set" describes this task.

  4. Optionally, update or delete the contents of the STS.

    "Modifying a SQL Tuning Set Using UPDATE_SQLSET" describes this task.

  5. Create a tuning task with the STS as input.

  6. Optionally, transport the STS to another database.

    "Transporting a SQL Tuning Set" describes this task.

  7. Drop the STS when finished.

    "Dropping a SQL Tuning Set Using DROP_SQLSET" describes this task.

See Also:

"Command-Line Interface to SQL Tuning Sets" for the names of the equivalent DBMS_SQLSET subprograms

23.2 Creating a SQL Tuning Set Using CREATE_SQLSET

Use the CREATE_SQLSET procedure in DBMS_SQLTUNE or DBMS_SQLSET to create an empty STS in the database.

Using the function instead of the procedure causes the database to generate a name for the STS. The following table describes some procedure parameters.

Table 23-2 DBMS_SQLSET.CREATE_SQLSET Parameters

Parameter Description

sqlset_name

Name of the STS

description

Optional description of the STS

Assumptions

This tutorial assumes that

  • You want to create an STS named SQLT_WKLD_STS.

  • You use DBMS_SQLTUNE instead of DBMS_SQLSET.

To create an STS:

  1. In SQL*Plus or SQL Developer, log in to the database as a user with the necessary privileges.

  2. Use the DBMS_SQLSET.CREATE_SQLSET procedure.

    For example, execute the following PL/SQL program:

    BEGIN
      DBMS_SQLSET.CREATE_SQLSET (
        sqlset_name  => 'SQLT_WKLD_STS' 
    ,   description  => 'STS to store SQL from the private SQL area' 
    );
    END;
    
  3. Optionally, confirm that the STS was created.

    The following example queries the status of all SQL tuning sets owned by the current user:

    COLUMN NAME FORMAT a20
    COLUMN COUNT FORMAT 99999
    COLUMN DESCRIPTION FORMAT a11
    
    SELECT NAME, STATEMENT_COUNT AS "SQLCNT", DESCRIPTION
    FROM   USER_SQLSET;
    

    Sample output appears below:

    NAME                 SQLCNT DESCRIPTION
    -------------------- ------ -----------
    SQLT_WKLD_STS             2 SQL Cache

See Also:

Oracle Database PL/SQL Packages and Types Reference for complete reference information

23.3 Loading a SQL Tuning Set Using LOAD_SQLSET

To load an STS with SQL statements, use the LOAD_SQLSET procedure in the DBMS_SQLTUNE or DBMS_SQLSET package.

The standard sources for populating an STS are AWR, another STS, or the shared SQL area. For both the workload repository and SQL tuning sets, predefined table functions can select columns from the source to populate a new STS.

The following table describes some DBMS_SQLSET.LOAD_SQLSET procedure parameters.

Table 23-3 DBMS_SQLSET.LOAD_SQLSET Parameters

Parameter Description

populate_cursor

Specifies the cursor reference from which to populate the STS.

load_option

Specifies how the statements are loaded into the STS. The possible values are INSERT (default), UPDATE, and MERGE.

The DBMS_SQLSET.SELECT_CURSOR_CACHE function collects SQL statements from the shared SQL area according to the specified filter. This function returns one SQLSET_ROW per SQL ID or PLAN_HASH_VALUE pair found in each data source.

Use the DBMS_SQLSET.CAPTURE_CURSOR_CACHE_SQLSET function (or the equivalent DBMS_SQLSET.CAPTURE_CURSOR_CACHE) to repeatedly poll the shared SQL area over a specified interval. This function is more efficient than repeatedly calling the SELECT_CURSOR_CACHE and LOAD_SQLSET procedures. This function effectively captures the entire workload, as opposed to the AWR, which only captures the workload of high-load SQL statements, or the LOAD_SQLSET procedure, which accesses the data source only once.

Prerequisites

This tutorial has the following prerequisites:

  • Filters provided to the SELECT_CURSOR_CACHE function are evaluated as part of SQL statements run by the current user. As such, they are executed with that user's security privileges and can contain any constructs and subqueries that user can access, but no more.

  • The current user must have privileges on the shared SQL area views.

Assumptions

This tutorial assumes the following:

  • You want to load the SQL tuning set named SQLT_WKLD_STS with statements from the shared SQL area.

  • You want to use DBMS_SQLSET rather than DBMS_SQLTUNE to load the STS.

To load an STS:

  1. In SQL*Plus or SQL Developer, log in to the database as a user with the necessary privileges.

  2. Run the DBMS_SQLSET.LOAD_SQLSET procedure.

    For example, execute the following PL/SQL program to populate a SQL tuning set with all cursor cache statements that belong to the sh schema:

    DECLARE
      c_sqlarea_cursor DBMS_SQLSET.SQLSET_CURSOR;
    BEGIN
     OPEN c_sqlarea_cursor FOR
       SELECT VALUE(p)
       FROM   TABLE( 
                DBMS_SQLSET.SELECT_CURSOR_CACHE(
                ' module = ''SQLT_WKLD'' AND parsing_schema_name = ''SH'' ')
              ) p;
    -- load the tuning set
      DBMS_SQLSET.LOAD_SQLSET (  
        sqlset_name     => 'SQLT_WKLD_STS'
    ,   populate_cursor =>  c_sqlarea_cursor 
    );
    END;
    /

See Also:

Oracle Database PL/SQL Packages and Types Reference for complete reference information.

23.4 Querying a SQL Tuning Set

To read the contents of an STS after it has been created and populated, use the SELECT_SQLSET function of DBMS_SQLTUNE or DBMS_SQLSET, optionally using filtering criteria.

Select the output of SELECT_SQLSET using a PL/SQL pipelined table function, which accepts a collection of rows as input. You invoke the table function as the operand of the table operator in the FROM list of a SELECT statement. The following table describes some SELECT_SQLSET function parameters.

Table 23-4 DBMS_SQLTUNE.SELECT_SQLSET Parameters

Parameter Description

basic_filter

The SQL predicate to filter the SQL from the STS defined on attributes of the SQLSET_ROW

object_filter

Specifies the objects that exist in the object list of selected SQL from the shared SQL area

The following table describes some attributes of the SQLSET_ROW object. These attributes appears as columns when you query TABLE(DBMS_SQLTUNE.SELECT_SQLSET()).

Table 23-5 SQLSET_ROW Attributes

Parameter Description

parsing_schema_name

Schema in which the SQL is parsed

elapsed_time

Sum of the total number of seconds elapsed for this SQL statement

buffer_gets

Total number of buffer gets (number of times the database accessed a block) for this SQL statement

Assumptions

This tutorial assumes the following:

  • You want to display the contents of an STS named SQLT_WKLD_STS.

  • You are using DBMS_SQLTUNE instead of DBMS_SQLSET.

To display the contents of an STS:

  1. In SQL*Plus or SQL Developer, log in to the database as a user with the necessary privileges.

  2. Query the STS contents using the TABLE function.

    For example, execute the following query:

    COLUMN SQL_TEXT FORMAT a30   
    COLUMN SCH FORMAT a3
    COLUMN ELAPSED FORMAT 999999999
    
    SELECT SQL_ID, PARSING_SCHEMA_NAME AS "SCH", SQL_TEXT, 
           ELAPSED_TIME AS "ELAPSED", BUFFER_GETS
    FROM   TABLE( DBMS_SQLTUNE.SELECT_SQLSET( 'SQLT_WKLD_STS' ) );
    

    Sample output appears below:

    SQL_ID        SCH SQL_TEXT                          ELAPSED BUFFER_GETS
    ------------- --- ------------------------------ ---------- -----------
    79f8shn041a1f SH  select * from sales where quan    8373148       24016
                      tity_sold < 5 union select * f
                      rom sales where quantity_sold
                      > 500
     
    2cqsw036j5u7r SH  select promo_name, count(*) c     3557373         309
                      from promotions p, sales s whe
                      re s.promo_id = p.promo_id and
                       p.promo_category = 'internet'
                       group by p.promo_name order b
                      y c desc
     
    fudq5z56g642p SH  select sum(quantity_sold) from    4787891       12118
                       sales s, products p where s.p
                      rod_id = p.prod_id and s.amoun
                      t_sold > 20000 and p.prod_name
                       = 'Linen Big Shirt'
     
    bzmnj0nbvmz8t SH  select * from sales where amou     442355       15281
                      nt_sold = 4
    
  3. Optionally, filter the results based on user-specific criteria.

    The following example displays statements with a disk reads to buffer gets ratio greater than or equal to 50%:

    COLUMN SQL_TEXT FORMAT a30   
    COLUMN SCH FORMAT a3
    COLUMN BUF_GETS FORMAT 99999999
    COLUMN DISK_READS FORMAT 99999999
    COLUMN %_DISK FORMAT 9999.99
    SELECT sql_id, parsing_schema_name as "SCH", sql_text, 
           buffer_gets as "B_GETS",
           disk_reads as "DR", ROUND(disk_reads/buffer_gets*100,2) "%_DISK"
    FROM TABLE( DBMS_SQLTUNE.SELECT_SQLSET( 
                'SQLT_WKLD_STS',
                '(disk_reads/buffer_gets) >= 0.50' ) );
    

    Sample output appears below:

    
    SQL_ID        SCH SQL_TEXT                       B_GETS DR      %_DISK
    ------------- --- ------------------------------ ------ ------- -------
    79f8shn041a1f SH  select * from sales where quan  24016   17287  71.98
                      tity_sold < 5 union select * f
                      rom sales where quantity_sold
                      > 500
     
    fudq5z56g642p SH  select sum(quantity_sold) from  12118    6355  52.44
                       sales s, products p where s.p
                      rod_id = p.prod_id and s.amoun
                      t_sold > 20000 and p.prod_name
                       = 'Linen Big Shirt'

See Also:

Oracle Database PL/SQL Packages and Types Reference for complete reference information

23.5 Modifying a SQL Tuning Set Using UPDATE_SQLSET

Use the UPDATE_SQLSET procedure in DBMS_SQLTUNE or DBMS_SQLSET to delete SQL statements from an STS.

You can use the UPDATE_SQLSET procedure to update the attributes of SQL statements (such as PRIORITY or OTHER) in an existing STS identified by STS name and SQL ID.

Assumptions

This tutorial assumes that you want to modify SQLT_WKLD_STS as follows:

  • You want to delete all SQL statements with fetch counts over 100.

  • You want to change the priority of the SQL statement with ID fudq5z56g642p to 1. You can use priority as a ranking criteria when running SQL Tuning Advisor.

  • You use DBMS_SQLSET instead of DBMS_SQLTUNE.

To modify the contents of an STS:

  1. In SQL*Plus or SQL Developer, log in to the database as a user with the necessary privileges.

  2. Optionally, query the STS contents using the TABLE function.

    For example, execute the following query:

    SELECT SQL_ID, ELAPSED_TIME, FETCHES, EXECUTIONS
    FROM   TABLE(DBMS_SQLSET.SELECT_SQLSET('SQLT_WKLD_STS'));
    

    Sample output appears below:

    SQL_ID        ELAPSED_TIME    FETCHES EXECUTIONS
    ------------- ------------ ---------- ----------
    2cqsw036j5u7r      3407459          2          1
    79f8shn041a1f      9453965      61258          1
    bzmnj0nbvmz8t       401869          1          1
    fudq5z56g642p      5300264          1          1
    
  3. Delete SQL statements based on user-specified criteria.

    Use the basic_filter predicate to filter the SQL from the STS defined on attributes of the SQLSET_ROW. The following example deletes all statements in the STS with fetch counts over 100:

    BEGIN
      DBMS_SQLSET.DELETE_SQLSET (
          sqlset_name  => 'SQLT_WKLD_STS'
    ,     basic_filter => 'fetches > 100'
    );
    END;
    /
    
  4. Set attribute values for SQL statements.

    The following example sets the priority of statement 2cqsw036j5u7r to 1:

    BEGIN
      DBMS_SQLSET.UPDATE_SQLSET ( 
          sqlset_name     => 'SQLT_WKLD_STS'    
    ,     sql_id          => '2cqsw036j5u7r'    
    ,     attribute_name  => 'PRIORITY'         
    ,     attribute_value =>  1
    );
    END;
    /
    
  5. Optionally, query the STS to confirm that the intended modifications were made.

    For example, execute the following query:

    SELECT SQL_ID, ELAPSED_TIME, FETCHES, EXECUTIONS, PRIORITY
    FROM   TABLE(DBMS_SQLSET.SELECT_SQLSET('SQLT_WKLD_STS'));
    

    Sample output appears below:

    SQL_ID        ELAPSED_TIME    FETCHES EXECUTIONS   PRIORITY
    ------------- ------------ ---------- ---------- ----------
    2cqsw036j5u7r      3407459          2          1          1
    bzmnj0nbvmz8t       401869          1          1
    fudq5z56g642p      5300264          1          1

23.6 Transporting a SQL Tuning Set

You can transport an STS to any database created in Oracle Database 10g Release 2 (10.2) or later. This technique is useful when using SQL Performance Analyzer to tune regressions on a test database.

This section contains the following topics:

23.6.1 About Transporting SQL Tuning Sets

Transporting SQL tuning sets between databases means copying the SQL tuning sets to and from a staging table, and then using other tools to move the staging table to the destination database. The most common tools are Oracle Data Pump or a database link.

This section contains the following topics:

23.6.1.1 Basic Steps for Transporting SQL Tuning Sets

Transporting SQL tuning sets requires exporting the STS, transporting the dump file, and then importing the dump file.

The following graphic shows the process using Oracle Data Pump and ftp.

Figure 23-4 Transporting SQL Tuning Sets

Description of Figure 23-4 follows
Description of "Figure 23-4 Transporting SQL Tuning Sets"

As shown in Figure 23-4, the steps are as follows:

  1. In the production database, pack the STS into a staging table using DBMS_SQLTUNE.PACK_STGTAB_SQLSET or DBMS_SQLSET.PACK_STGTAB.

  2. Export the STS from the staging table to a .dmp file using Oracle Data Pump.

  3. Transfer the .dmp file from the production host to the test host using a transfer tool such as ftp.

  4. In the test database, import the STS from the .dmp file to a staging table using Oracle Data Pump.

  5. Unpack the STS from the staging table using DBMS_SQLTUNE.UNPACK_STGTAB_SQLSET or DBMS_SQLSET.UNPACK_STGTAB.

23.6.1.2 Basic Steps for Transporting SQL Tuning Sets When the CON_DBID Values Differ

When transporting an STS, you must remap the con_dbid of each SQL statement in the STS when the con_dbid of the source database and the destination database are different.

Situations that cause the con_dbid value to differ include the following:

  • A single-instance database whose instance has been restarted

  • Different instances of an Oracle RAC database

  • Different PDBs

  • A non-CDB and a CDB

The basic steps for remapping are as follows:

  1. Pack the STS into a staging table using DBMS_SQLTUNE.PACK_STGTAB_SQLSET or DBMS_SQLSET.PACK_STGTAB.

  2. Remap each con_dbid in the staging table using DBMS_SQLTUNE.REMAP_STGTAB_SQLSET or DBMS_SQLSET.REMAP_STGTAB.

  3. Export the STS.

  4. Unpack the STS in the destination CDB.

Example 23-1 Remapping a CON_DBID When Transporting an STS from a Non-CDB to a CDB

In this example, you intend to transport an STS named STS_for_transport from a non-CDB to a CDB. On the source non-CDB, you have already packed the STS into source staging table src_stg_tbl using the DBMS_SQLTUNE.PACK_STGTAB_SQLSET procedure. The container ID of the destination CDB is 12345.

In the source non-CDB, you execute the following commands:

VARIABLE con_dbid_src NUMBER;

EXEC SELECT UNIQUE con_dbid INTO :con_dbid_src FROM src_stg_tbl;

BEGIN
  DBMS_SQLTUNE.REMAP_STGTAB_SQLSET (
    staging_table_name   => 'src_stg_tbl'
,   staging_schema_owner => 'dba1'
,   old_sqlset_name      => 'STS_for_transport'
,   old_con_dbid         => :con_dbid_src
,   new_con_dbid         => 12345);
END;

You can now export the contents of the staging table, and then continue using the normal transport procedure.

See Also:

Oracle Database PL/SQL Packages and Types Reference to learn about REMAP_STGTAB_SQLSET

23.6.2 Transporting SQL Tuning Sets with DBMS_SQLTUNE

You can transport SQL tuning sets using three subprograms in the DBMS_SQLTUNE or DBMS_SQLSET package.

The following table describes the procedures relevant for transporting SQL tuning sets.

Table 23-6 Procedures for Transporting SQL Tuning Sets

DBMS_SQLTUNE Procedure Equivalent DBMS_SQLSET Procedure Description

CREATE_STGTAB_SQLSET

CREATE_STGTAB

Create a staging table to hold the exported SQL tuning sets

PACK_STGTAB_SQLSET

PACK_STGTAB

Populate a staging table with SQL tuning sets

UNPACK_STGTAB_SQLSET

UNPACK_STGTAB

Copy the SQL tuning sets from the staging table into a database

Assumptions

This tutorial assumes the following:

  • An STS with regressed SQL resides in a production database created in the current release.

  • You run SQL Performance Analyzer trials on a remote test database created in Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2).

  • You want to copy the STS from the production database to the test database and tune the regressions from the SQL Performance Analyzer trials.

  • You want to use Oracle Database Pump to transfer the SQL tuning sets between database hosts.

  • You use DBMS_SQLTUNE rather than DBMS_SQLSET.

To transport an STS:

  1. In SQL*Plus or SQL Developer, log in to the database as a user with administrative privileges.

  2. Use the CREATE_STGTAB_SQLSET procedure to create a staging table to hold the exported SQL tuning sets.

    The following example creates my_11g_staging_table in the dba1 schema and specifies the format of the staging table as 11.2:

    BEGIN
      DBMS_SQLTUNE.CREATE_STGTAB_SQLSET ( 
        table_name  => 'my_10g_staging_table'
    ,   schema_name => 'dba1'
    ,   db_version  => DBMS_SQLTUNE.STS_STGTAB_11_2_VERSION 
    );
    END;
    /
    
  3. Use the PACK_STGTAB_SQLSET procedure to populate the staging table with SQL tuning sets.

    The following example populates dba1.my_11g_staging_table with the STS my_sts owned by hr:

    BEGIN
      DBMS_SQLTUNE.PACK_STGTAB_SQLSET (      
        sqlset_name         => 'sqlt_wkld_sts'
    ,   sqlset_owner        => 'sh'
    ,   staging_table_name  => 'my_11g_staging_table'
    ,   staging_schema_owner => 'dba1'
    ,   db_version          => DBMS_SQLTUNE.STS_STGTAB_11_2_VERSION 
    );
    END;
    / 
    
  4. If necessary, remap the container ID values for the statements in the STS as described in "Basic Steps for Transporting SQL Tuning Sets When the CON_DBID Values Differ".

  5. Use Oracle Data Pump to export the contents of the staging table.

    For example, run the expdp command at the operating system prompt:

    expdp dba1 DIRECTORY=dpump_dir1 DUMPFILE=sts.dmp TABLES=my_11g_staging_table
    
  6. Transfer the dump file to the test database host.

  7. Log in to the test host as an administrator, and then use Oracle Data Pump to import the contents of the staging table.

    For example, run the impdp command at the operating system prompt:

    impdp dba1 DIRECTORY=dpump_dir1 DUMPFILE=sts.dmp TABLES=my_11g_staging_table 
    
  8. On the test database, execute the UNPACK_STGTAB_SQLSET procedure to copy the SQL tuning sets from the staging table into the database.

    The following example shows how to unpack the SQL tuning sets:

    BEGIN
      DBMS_SQLTUNE.UNPACK_STGTAB_SQLSET (
        sqlset_name        => '%'
    ,   replace            => true
    ,   staging_table_name => 'my_11g_staging_table');
    END;
    /

See Also:

Oracle Database PL/SQL Packages and Types Reference to learn more about DBMS_SQLTUNE.UNPACK_STGTAB_SQLSET

23.7 Dropping a SQL Tuning Set Using DROP_SQLSET

To drop an STS from the database, use the DROP_SQLSET procedure in the DBMS_SQLTUNE or DBMS_SQLSET package.

Prerequisites

Ensure that no tuning task is currently using the STS to be dropped. If an existing tuning task is using this STS, then drop the task before dropping the STS. Otherwise, the database issues an ORA-13757 error.

Assumptions

This tutorial assumes the following:

  • You want to drop an STS named SQLT_WKLD_STS.

  • You use DBMS_SQLSET instead of DBMS_SQLTUNE.

To drop an STS:

  1. In SQL*Plus or SQL Developer, log in to the database as a user with the necessary privileges.

  2. Use the DBMS_SQLSET.DROP_SQLSET procedure.

    For example, execute the following PL/SQL program:

    BEGIN
      DBMS_SQLSET.DROP_SQLSET( sqlset_name => 'SQLT_WKLD_STS' );
    END;
    /
    
  3. Optionally, confirm that the STS was deleted.

    The following example counts the number of SQL tuning sets named SQLT_WKLD_STS owned by the current user (sample output included):

    SELECT COUNT(*) 
    FROM   USER_SQLSET 
    WHERE  NAME = 'SQLT_WKLD_STS';
    
      COUNT(*)
    ----------
             0

See Also:

Oracle Database PL/SQL Packages and Types Reference to learn about the STS procedures in DBMS_SQLSET