3 Next Steps After Installing Oracle JDeveloper Studio

After installing Oracle JDeveloper, you can start JDeveloper and perform related tasks.

Preparing to Start Oracle JDeveloper

You can start Oracle JDeveloper on Linux, UNIX, Mac OS X, Windows, and multiuser environments.

Optimizing Oracle JDeveloper on Linux, UNIX, and Mac OS X

Before you start Oracle JDeveloper, you can specify settings for Linux, UNIX, and Mac OS X environments.

Setting the System Resource Limit

The minimum recommended system resource for Oracle JDeveloper on Linux systems is 4096.

To determine the resource limit configuration for your system, enter the following command:

/bin/sh -c 'ulimit -n'

If the value returned is less than 4096, set the system resource limit as follows:

  1. Open the limits.conf file, which is located at /etc/security/.
  2. Find the following parameters:
    soft nofile value_of_the_parameter
    hard nofile value_of_the_parameter
    
  3. Change the value of these parameters to 4096:
    soft nofile 4096
    hard nofile 4096

    Note:

    If the parameters listed in Step 2 do not exist, add the parameters with their values as listed in Step 3 to the limits.conf file.

Setting the User Home Directory on Linux, UNIX, and Mac OS X

You can permanently redefine the location of your user home directory in a Linux, UNIX, or Mac OS X environment.

When you define the user home directory, it will contain a system subdirectory that stores the user's preferences for JDeveloper, also known as the domain home. The user home directory also contains a separate subdirectory for user-generated content and other configuration files that are specific to a given user, also known as the application home.

If you do not define a user home directory, these subdirectories are located in different areas on your computer.

  • The default location for the system subdirectory is $HOME/.jdeveloper/system12.2.1.4.XX.XX.XX, where XX.XX.XX is the unique number of the product build.

  • The default location for user-generated content is $HOME/jdeveloper/mywork.

There are two ways to set your user home directory if you do not want your JDeveloper files to be stored at $HOME. Both methods set the user home directory for all instances of JDeveloper on your system.

Use either of the following methods to set the user home directory:

Editing product.conf

With 12c (12.2.1.4.0), many JDeveloper settings, including the location of your JDK, are stored in product.conf. This file is created by JDeveloper on first startup unless the file exists from a previous installation. JDeveloper uses the settings stored in product.conf even if they are from a previous installation.

Note:

In earlier versions of JDeveloper, product.conf was named jdev.conf.

  1. Find the product.conf file. It should be located at $HOME/.jdeveloper/12.2.1.4.0.

  2. Open product.conf in an editor. Add a line to set AddVMOption -Dide.user.dir to your preferred directory path.

    For example, if your preferred directory is $HOME/mydocs/jdevfiles, your definition should look like this:

    AddVMOption -Dide.user.dir=$HOME/mydocs/jdevfiles
    

    Caution:

    Do not use a directory that contains spaces as the home directory. For example, do not specify $HOME/my projects as the home directory.

  3. Save your changes. The changes should take effect immediately when you start JDeveloper. The changes made to product.conf will also override any environment variable that you have defined.

    When you start Oracle JDeveloper for the first time, you can verify that the user home directory has been set to your preferred directory by clicking About in the Help menu, toggling the Properties tab, and finding the definition for ide.user.dir.

Setting the JDEV_USER_DIR environment variable

You can set the JDEV_USER_DIR environment variable to your preferred home directory path. The following examples and syntax are for the bash shell on Linux systems.

  1. Open your startup configuration file with an editor. For the bash shell, this file is named .bashrc. The configuration file should be located in your home directory. If the appropriate file for your shell does not exist at this location, create a new file.
  2. Set the environment variable JDEV_USER_DIR to your preferred directory.

    For example, if your preferred directory is $HOME/mydocs/jdevfiles, your definition may look like this:

    export JDEV_USER_DIR=$HOME/mydocs/jdevfiles
    

    Caution:

    Do not use a directory that contains spaces as the home directory. For example, do not specify $HOME/my project folder as the home directory.

  3. Save your file and exit the editor. Start a new terminal session.
  4. To confirm the change, at the command line, use the following command to display the environment variable:
    echo $JDEV_USER_DIR
    

    The output is the directory you specified. For this example, the command outputs the following:

    $HOME/mydocs/jdevfiles
    

When you start Oracle JDeveloper for the first time, you can verify that the user home directory has been set to your preferred directory by clicking About in the Help menu, toggling the Properties tab, and finding the definition for ide.user.dir.

Changing the JDK Location on Linux, UNIX, and Mac OS X

You can permanently change the location of your JDK, if the location has changed since the first time you started JDeveloper.

To change a JDK location:

  1. Find the product.conf file. The file is located at $HOME/.jdeveloper/12.2.1.4.0.
  2. Open product.conf in an editor. Find the following line:
    SetJavaHome /path/jdk
  3. Uncomment this line, and replace /path/jdk with the path to your JDK directory.

    For example, if the location of your JDK is /usr/local/java, your definition looks like the following:

    SetJavaHome /usr/local/java
    

This sets the JDK path for all installations of JDeveloper on your system.

If you uninstall JDeveloper but do not delete the product.conf file, all settings stored in this file, including the JDK path, are preserved for future installations. If you reinstall the same version of JDeveloper as your previous installation, your new installation automatically reads that JDK location again.

Changing System Cursors on Linux, UNIX, and Mac OS X

On Linux platforms, the Java cursors might display as large and opaque, creating difficulties when used for drag and drop operations.

To address this problem, Oracle JDeveloper provides a set of cursors to replace the default set. You must have write access to the JDK to replace the cursors.

To replace the cursors:

  1. Create a backup copy of the default cursors located in the JDK directory at:

    jdk_install/jre/lib/images/cursors

  2. Extract the replacement cursors from the .tar file as follows:

    1. Navigate to the following location on your system:

      JDEV_HOME/jdeveloper/jdev/bin/clear_cursors.tar
      
    2. To extract the replacement cursors from the tar file, run the following command:

      tar -xvf clear_cursors.tar
      

Optimizing Oracle JDeveloper on Windows

Before starting Oracle JDeveloper, you can specify settings for a Windows environment.

Setting the User Home Directory on Windows

You can permanently redefine the location of your user home directory in a Windows environment.

When you define a user home directory, it will contain a system subdirectory that stores the user's preferences for JDeveloper, also known as the domain home. The user home directory also contains a separate subdirectory for user-generated content and other configuration files that are specific to a given user, also known as the application home.

If you do not define a user home directory, these subdirectories are located in different locations.

  • The default location for the system subdirectory is:

    • %USERPROFILE%\AppData\Roaming\JDeveloper\system12.2.1.4.XX.XX.XX on Windows 7 systems

    • %USERPROFILE%\Application Data\JDeveloper\system12.2.1.4.XX.XX.XX on all other Windows platforms

    In these locations, XX.XX.XX is the unique number of the product build.

  • The default location of the user-generated content is:

    • C:\JDeveloper\mywork on Windows 7 systems

    • C:\Documents and Settings\My Documents\JDeveloper\mywork on all other Windows platforms

There are two ways to set your user home directory if you do not want your JDeveloper files to be stored at the default location. Both methods set the user home directory for all instances of JDeveloper on your system.

Use either of the following methods to set the user home directory:

Editing product.conf

With 12c (12.2.1.4.0), many JDeveloper settings, including the location of your JDK, are stored in product.conf. This file is created by JDeveloper on first startup unless the file already exists from a previous installation. JDeveloper uses the settings stored in product.conf even if they are from a previous installation.

Note:

In earlier versions of JDeveloper, product.conf was named jdev.conf.

  1. Find the product.conf file. It should be located at %USERPROFILE%\AppData\Roaming\JDeveloper\system12.2.1.4.XX.XX.XX.

  2. Open product.conf in an editor. Add a line to set AddVMOption -Dide.user.dir to your preferred directory path.

    For example, if your preferred directory is N:\users\jdoe, your definition should look like this:

    AddVMOption -Dide.user.dir=N:\users\jdoe
    

    Caution:

    Do not use a directory that contains spaces as the home directory. For example, do not specify C:\My Projects as the home directory.

  3. Save your changes. The changes should take effect immediately when you start JDeveloper. The changes made to product.conf also overrides any environment variable you have defined.

    When you start Oracle JDeveloper for the first time, you can verify that the user home directory has been set to your preferred directory by clicking About in the Help menu, toggling the Properties tab, and finding the definition for ide.user.dir.

Setting the environment variable JDEV_USER_DIR

You can set the environment variable JDEV_USER_DIRto your preferred home directory path on a Windows system, including individual users of Oracle JDeveloper on a multiuser system.

  1. From the Windows Start menu, select Control Panel, and then select System.
  2. Click Advanced system settings, then click Environment Variables.
  3. In the User Variables section, click New.
  4. Add JDEV_USER_DIR as a user variable.
  5. Set the value of this variable to your home directory (for example, N:\users\jdoe), and click OK.

    Caution:

    Do not use a directory that contains spaces as the home directory. For example, do not specify C:\My Projects as the home directory.

  6. To check your variable setting, open a command shell and enter the following command:

    set

    This lists all your defined variables. Verify that your newly defined variable appears similar to the following:

    JDEV_USER_DIR=N:\users\jdoe

When you start Oracle JDeveloper for the first time, you can verify that the user home directory has been set to your preferred directory by clicking About in the Help menu, toggling the Properties tab, and finding the definition for ide.user.dir.

Changing the JDK location on Windows

You can permanently change the location of your JDK, if the location has changed since the first time you started JDeveloper.

To change a JDK location:

  1. Find the product.conf file. The file is located at %USERPROFILE%\AppData\Roaming\JDeveloper\system12.2.1.4.XX.XX.XX.
  2. Open product.conf in an editor. Find the following line:
    SetJavaHome \path\jdk
  3. Uncomment this line, and replace \path\jdk with the path to your JDK directory.

    For example, if the location of your JDK is jdk1.8.0_60 on your D: drive, your definition looks like the following:

    SetJavaHome D:\jdk1.8.0_60
    

This sets the JDK path for all installations of JDeveloper on your system.

If you uninstall JDeveloper but do not delete the product.conf file, all settings stored in this file, including the JDK path, are preserved. If you reinstall the same version of JDeveloper as your previous installation, your new installation automatically reads that JDK location again.

Optimizing Oracle JDeveloper in a Multiuser Environment

When you install and configure Oracle JDeveloper for a multiuser environment, you need to account the number of users and the power of the server so that you can deliver optimal performance for JDeveloper and your users.

Multiuser environments include Microsoft Terminal Server, Citrix MetaFrame and Citrix MetaFrame XP for Windows, and Citrix MetaFrame 1.1 for UNIX. These environments allow many clients to access one installation of Oracle JDeveloper. In all cases, users can save their projects locally.

Installing Oracle JDeveloper on a Citrix MetaFrame Server or a Microsoft Terminal Server

With administrative privileges, you can install Oracle JDeveloper on a Citrix MetaFrame server or a Microsoft Terminal Server.

Run the Oracle JDeveloper installer on your server as detailed in Installing Oracle JDeveloper. Do not start Oracle JDeveloper at the end of installation, because you must first configure the user home directories and terminal server clients as described in the following sections.

Configuring Terminal Server Clients to Run Oracle JDeveloper

After you install a Citrix MetaFrame or Microsoft Terminal Server client locally and JDeveloper is installed and configured, you can configure a Terminal Server client to run Oracle JDeveloper.

  1. Verify that the color resolution of the Terminal Server client has been set to at least 256 colors.
  2. Sign in to the server.
  3. Verify that the user home environment variable has been defined. Confirm the naming convention that is used on your system. The default variable is JDEV_USER_DIR.
  4. Start Oracle JDeveloper.
  5. Oracle JDeveloper prompts you to confirm that the user home directory needs to be created. Click Yes.
  6. Verify that the user home directory has been set to your preferred directory:
    • From the Help menu, select About.

    • Toggle the Properties tab, and find the definition for ide.user.dir.

Troubleshooting a System DLL ole32.dll Memory Error

You may encounter the following error when you run Oracle JDeveloper in a multiuser environment:

The system DLL ole32.dll was relocated in memory. The application will not run properly. The relocation occurred because the DLL Dynamically Allocated Memory occupied an address range reserved for Windows NT system DLL's. The vendor supplying the DLL should be contacted for a new DLL.

If you see this error, update the product.conf file in $HOME/.jdeveloper/12.2.1.4.0 file by uncommenting the following parameter:

AddVMOption -Xheapbase100000000

In addition, each user must modify the default project to apply this setting. To specify this value in the default project settings:

  1. In the Application menu, select Default Project Properties.
  2. In the Default Project Properties dialog, click Run/Debug/Profile, and then click Edit.
  3. Click the Launch Settings node.
  4. On the Launch Settings page, enter -Xheapbase100000000 in the Java Options field.

Starting Oracle JDeveloper

To start Oracle JDeveloper, follow the steps for the operating system you are using, or start it from the command line.

On Linux, UNIX, and Mac OS X operating systems:
  1. Go to the bin directory.
    JDEV_HOME/jdeveloper/jdev/bin/
    
  2. Start JDeveloper:
    ./jdev

On Windows operating systems:

  • From the Start Menu, select All Programs, select Oracle Fusion Middleware 12.2.1.4.0, and then select JDeveloper Studio 12.2.1.4.0.

On the command line, enter one of the following commands:

  • JDEV_HOME\jdeveloper\jdeveloper.exe

  • JDEV_HOME\jdeveloper\jdev\bin\jdevw.exe

  • JDEV_HOME\jdeveloper\jdev\bin\jdev.exe (to display a console window for internal diagnostic information)

Migrating Oracle JDeveloper From a Previous Version

Oracle JDeveloper 12c (12.2.1.4.0) supports migration from Oracle JDeveloper 11.1.1.9.0 or 11.1.2.3.0.

Oracle recommends that you migrate to Oracle JDeveloper 11.1.1.9.0 or 11.1.2.3.0 from all other earlier versions before you migrate to this release of Oracle JDeveloper.

Migrating User Settings

When you start Oracle JDeveloper for the first time (and each time that you add a new extension or upgrade to a newer version), JDeveloper displays the Confirm Import Preferences dialog to confirm whether to import your preferences and settings from a previous installation.

When the Confirm Import Preferences dialog box appears, click Show All Installations to view a list of all the previous installations. From this list, choose the installation that you want to import preferences and settings from. When you hover the mouse over an item in list, the path to the installation appears as a tooltip.

Alternatively, you can click Find a previous installation manually (with the image of a magnifying glass) at the top right of the installation list to browse for an installation manually. Clicking Yes in the Confirm Import Preferences dialog imports user preferences and the state of the IDE from the previous installation.

To force Oracle JDeveloper to display the Confirm Import Preferences dialog upon subsequent startups, use the -migrate flag when you start Oracle JDeveloper from the command line. For example, use jdev -migrate.

Note:

If you migrate to 12c (12.2.1.4.0) from another version of Oracle JDeveloper, reinstall the extensions that you want to use. Some extensions for older versions might no longer exist.

For more information on installing extensions, see Enabling Oracle JDeveloper Extensions.

Migrating Projects

When you open an application or project that was created in a previous release, Oracle JDeveloper prompts you to migrate the project to Oracle JDeveloper 12c. Depending on the content of the projects, Oracle JDeveloper might display additional prompts to migrate some specific source files as well.

Oracle recommends that you create a backup copy of your projects before you migrate them. When you accept the initial prompts to migrate your projects, JDeveloper updates the format for crucial XML files but does not rewrite or update specific project code. After migration, retest your applications to verify that they work.

See the Oracle JDeveloper page on OTN for more information about migrating specific types of projects to 12c.

Migrating JSF and JSTL Projects

This release of Oracle JDeveloper requires that you migrate all projects with JavaServer Faces and JSTL to the latest versions of the technologies (version 2.0 and 1.2 respectively). Also, any web.xml deployment descriptors are migrated to version 2.5.

For the most current information on migration, see the Oracle JDeveloper documentation page on OTN: http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/developer-tools/jdev/documentation/1212-cert-1964670.html#Abrams-SupportInformation-MigrationSupport.

Using Headless Migration

You can also migrate files silently from the command line using the headless migration tool. This tool can be found at jdeveloper/jdev/bin/ojmigrate.

Understanding How to Use ojmigrate

The ojmigrate command has uses the following structure:

ojmigrate [option]... file...|@file

The option parameter is optional. The file or the @file parameter value is required.

Using the option Parameter

You can use the following flags for the option parameter:

  • -ade to connect to the current ADE view
  • -dry to initiate a dry run and skip calling migrators
  • -failFast to stop the migration after the first failure
  • -generateDefaults to let migrator helpers generate a migration.prperties file, alongside the .jws file, that contains the defaults for migration options.

To view these values and their use cases, invoke the help file for ojmigrate at the command line.

Using the file Parameter

To migrate one application, specify the path to the .jws file you want to migrate as the value for file.

For example, to migrate example.jws with no option flag, the command is the following:

ojmigrate example.jws

To migrate more than one application, use the @file parameter described in the next section.

Using the @file Parameter

To migrate more than one application at a time, create a file that contains all the paths to the applications that you want to migrate, and use the @file parameter to point to this file.

To autogenerate this file, use a script like the following:

find . -name "*.jws" -printf "%P\n" > workspaces.txt

After this file is generated, check the file to make sure that all the applications you want migrated are included. You can also create the file manually.

Once you have created and saved this file, specify its path as the value for @file in the example command structure. The @ symbol must be preppended to your filename when you specify this parameter.

For example, if you have listed the location of multiple .jws files in example.txt, your command would be the following:

ojmigrate @example.txt
Troubleshooting ojmigrate

If you encounter errors during migration, you can try to troubleshoot them by using the strategies in this section. To isolate the cause of your errors, run ojmigrate with the -failFast flag. This stops ojmigrate after its first unsuccessful migration and analyzes the issue.

Migrating Applications With -ade

If you see messages about being unable to check out read-only files, migrate these applications in ADE.

Make sure that you are in ADE view and that you have a transaction started. Because the ADE extension is not part of the JDeveloper non-debug builds, you should either use a JDeveloper debug build or manually install the ADE extension.

Once you are in ADE view, invoke ojmigrate with the -ade flag.

The commands that are mentioned in this section resemble the following:

ade useview VIEW_NAME
ade begintrans TXN_NAME 
ojmigrate -ade @workspaces.txt

Using a Two-Pass Migration

Migration may have failed because some migrators require extra data normally provided in the migration wizard, or because the defaults that the migrators are using are not suitable for your application. In these cases, do a two-pass migration.

For the first pass, run the ojmigrate command with the -generateDefaults flag. The command resembles the following:

ojmigrate -genarateDefaults @workspaces.txt

This command generates a properties file that contains a list of defaults that are formatted as name/value pairs with comments. The key/value pair is per application and per NodeMigratorHelper, meaning that there is one set of key pairs for every application, and the key is prefixed with the class name of the corresponding NodeMigratorHelper.

The properties file is generated beside the .jws application that you are trying to migrate. Its title is formatted as workspacename.migration.properties.

If the file is generated, open it, change the appropriate values, and save your changes. If you do not see the file after you run the command, no migrators generated defaults.

On the second pass, run the command without the -generateDefaults flag.

ojmigrate @workspaces.txt

If you still encounter errors, then some migrators may not be headless-friendly. A developer should prepare your migrator for headless migration before you attempt the two-pass migration again.

Preparing a NodeMigratorHelper for Headless Migration

If you need data from the user before migration, do the following:

  1. Override the NodeMigratorHelper.generateDefaults(MigrationInf[], TraversableContext) method. This method is called on your helper on the first run of the two-pass migration.

    Then, use the putDefault(String key, String value, String comment) method to store the keys and the default values that you retrieve on second run of the two-pass migration.

  2. In your helper's migration method, call isMigrationHeadless() on the helper to test whether the migration is headless. If the migration is headless, use to getDefault(your_key) method to ask for your data values. Read the data and act accordingly during the migration.

Enabling Oracle JDeveloper Extensions

Oracle JDeveloper extensions (such as JUnit) are available through JDeveloper or by downloading from OTN.

To locate and install extensions using Oracle JDeveloper:

  1. Start JDeveloper.

  2. Click Help, then select Check for Updates to start an Update wizard.

  3. On the first screen of the Update wizard, Oracle Fusion Middleware Products and Official Oracle Extensions and Updates are selected by default. Select the other two boxes for more options.

    Note:

    Starting in 12c (12.1.3), you can no longer download SOA extensions. Use a Quick Start distribution to obtain a version of JDeveloper pre-configured for either SOA Suite or Business Process Management Suite. For more information, see Introducing the Quick Start Distributions in Oracle Fusion Middleware Installing Oracle SOA Suite and Business Process Management Suite Quick Start for Developers.

    Click Next when you have identified and selected your sources.

  4. On the Updates screen, select the extensions that you want to install, and click Next.

  5. On the License Agreements screen, agree to the license terms for the extensions that you selected on the previous screen. Click Next to begin the download.

  6. When the extensions have finished downloading, the wizard displays a summary of the installations or upgrades that you installed. Click Finish to exit the wizard.

  7. In the dialog box that appears, respond to the prompt to restart JDeveloper to finish installing updates.

Alternatively, you can manually download and install an Oracle JDeveloper extension from OTN as follows:

  1. Go to the following web page: Oracle Fusion Middleware Products Update Center.
  2. Select an Oracle JDeveloper extension. Make sure that you are selecting extensions for 12c (12.2.1.4.0), as there are different versions of each extension for different versions of JDeveloper.
  3. Follow the instructions to download the .zip file.
  4. Check for additional installation instructions in the extension archive.
  5. From the Help menu, select Check for Updates.
  6. In Step 1 of the wizard, select Install from a Local File and navigate to the .zip file on your system.
  7. Finish the wizard, and restart Oracle JDeveloper to use the extension.

Understanding Oracle JDeveloper Accessibility Information

You can use a screen reader with Oracle JDeveloper and become familiar with assistive technologies in Oracle products and Oracle JDeveloper.

Using a Screen Reader and Java Access Bridge with Oracle JDeveloper

To make the best use of accessibility features, Oracle Corporation recommends the following minimum configuration:

  • Windows XP, Windows Vista

  • Java J2SE 1.7.0_15

  • Java Access Bridge 2.0.1

  • JAWS 12.0.522

  • Microsoft Internet Explorer 7.0 or later

  • Mozilla Firefox 3.5 or later

To set up a screen reader and Java Access Bridge, follow these steps.

Note:

  • These steps apply to machines that have the Windows operating system.

  • Use a screen reader that is compatible with Windows.

  1. Install the screen reader if it is not already installed.

    For more information, refer to the documentation for your screen reader.

  2. Install Oracle JDeveloper.
  3. Download Java Access Bridge for Windows version 2.0.1. The latest version of the file is available at the following location: http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/tech/index-jsp-136191.html

    For more information about Java Access Bridge, refer to the Java Access Bridge documentation on the web site.

  4. Extract the contents of the ,zip file to a folder, accessbridge_home.
  5. Install Java Access Bridge by running the install.exe file from the accessbridge_home\installer folder.

    The installer checks the JDK version for compatibility. Then, the Available Java virtual machines dialog appears.

  6. Click Search Disks. Customize your search for only the drive that contains the Oracle JDeveloper build and the JDK version in the program files directory (if it exists).

    The search process can take a long time if the disk that has many instances of JDK or Oracle JDeveloper, or when searching multiple disks. However, unless you complete an exhaustive search of your disk, Access Bridge will not be configured optimally, and will not be correctly installed to all of the Java virtual machines on your system. After selecting the disk to search, click Search.

  7. To confirm that you want to install the Java Access Bridge into each of the Java virtual machines displayed in the dialog, click Install in All.
  8. When you see the Installation Completed message, click OK.
  9. Confirm that the following files have been installed in the Winnt\System32 directory (or the equivalent Windows XP or Vista directory), or copy them from accessbridge_home\installerfiles, as they must be in the system path to work with Oracle JDeveloper:
    JavaAccessBridge.dll
    JAWTAccessBridge.dll
    WindowsAccessBridge.dll 
    

    The system directory is required in the PATH system variable.

  10. Confirm that the following files have been installed in the JDEV_HOME\jdk\jre\lib\ext directory, or copy them from accessbridge_home\installerfiles:
    access-bridge.jar
    jaccess-1_4.jar
    
  11. Confirm that the file accessibility.properties has been installed in the jdev_home\jdk\jre\lib directory, or copy it from \installerfiles.
  12. Start your screen reader.
  13. Start Oracle JDeveloper by running the file jdev.exe located in the folder JDEV_HOME\jdeveloper\jdev\bin.

A console window that contains error information (if any) appears first. The Oracle JDeveloper window appears when Oracle JDeveloper starts up. Any error or warning messages that appear do not affect the functionality of Oracle JDeveloper.

Finding Accessibility Information

For the latest configuration information or for information about addressing accessibility and assistive technology issues, see the Oracle Accessibility FAQ at http://www.oracle.com/us/corporate/accessibility/faqs/index.htm. See also Oracle JDeveloper Accessibility Information in Oracle Fusion Middleware Developing Applications with Oracle JDeveloper.

Using Oracle WebLogic Server with Oracle JDeveloper

Installing Oracle JDeveloper Studio 12c (12.2.1.4.0) also automatically installs Oracle WebLogic Server 12c (12.2.1.4.0).

Note:

The information in this section is not applicable to the Java edition of Oracle JDeveloper.

Oracle JDeveloper uses the preconfigured Oracle WebLogic Server installation as the Integrated Oracle WebLogic Server and JDeveloper managed server for testing and debugging your applications from within the IDE. After you install Oracle JDeveloper, all the applications that you need to begin developing, testing, and debugging are installed and configured.

For additional information about using a standalone Oracle WebLogic Server instance with JDeveloper, see Deploying Applications in Oracle Fusion Middleware Developing Applications with Oracle JDeveloper.

Using the Integrated Oracle WebLogic Server

Oracle JDeveloper is bundled with an integrated application server called Integrated WebLogic Server, and a default instance called IntegratedWebLogicServer is defined for it.

By default, all applications are bound to IntegratedWebLogicServer. Oracle JDeveloper manages the Integrated WebLogic Server lifecycle for testing your application. The first time that Integrated WebLogic Server is needed, Oracle JDeveloper creates the default domain and prompts you to provide the administrative user name and password. The location of configuration files for the default domain is the default domain directory in the Oracle JDeveloper system directory.

Note:

The Oracle WebLogic Server domain that is created for you during installation, default domain, is not intended for use outside of the IDE. To deploy ADF applications to a standalone Oracle WebLogic Server, the server must be configured to run ADF applications. See Preparing the Standalone Application Server for Deployment in Oracle Fusion Middleware Administering Oracle ADF Applications.

The IntegratedWebLogicServer's default domain uses Java DB. If the IntegratedWebLogicServer fails to create the default domain, you should search for any pre-existing instances of Java DB or Derby Client running in the background and stop them.

Additional Resources

Useful Oracle resources related to Oracle JDeveloper are available on the Web.

The following table lists some helpful sites:

Table 3-1 Oracle Resources on the Web

Description URL

Oracle JDeveloper Home Pages

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/developer-tools/jdev/overview/index.html

Oracle JDeveloper Discussion Forum

http://forums.oracle.com/forums/forum.jspa?forumID=83

Corporate Site

http://www.oracle.com/

Oracle Technology Network

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/index.html

Oracle Accessibility Site

http://www.oracle.com/us/corporate/accessibility/index.html

Setting the Language for Log Messages Generated by the JDeveloper Integrated Server

If you are installing Oracle JDeveloper in a non-English environment, the messages written to the JDeveloper Integrated Server log files will be written by using the locale of the host operating system.

Specifically, on Windows systems, if you want the messages in the log files to be in a specific language, ensure to configure the operating system to use the language of choice. This is true of most Java applications.

Complete the following steps to change the language setting on a Windows system:
  1. Complete the instructions specified in How do I view and change the system locale settings to use my language of choice? on the Java.com Web site.

  2. Change the language format:

    1. Go to the Control Panel > Region and Language > Formats tab.

    2. In the Formats tab, select English (United States) from the Format drop-down list.