1 About the Oracle HTTP Server Installation

The standard installation for Oracle HTTP Server described in this guide creates the standard topology, which represents a sample starting topology for this product.

About Oracle HTTP Server

Oracle HTTP Server provides web services for Oracle Fusion Middleware.

In summary, Oracle HTTP Server:

  • Delivers the HTTP Listener for the Oracle WebLogic Server through the built-in Oracle WebLogic Server Proxy Plug-In

  • Provides the Web Server component for Oracle Fusion Middleware

  • Serves static web content, such as HTML, JavaScript, images, and dynamic web content built with CGI/FastCGI-based applications.

See Introduction to Oracle HTTP Server in Administering Oracle HTTP Server.

Oracle HTTP Server can be installed in either an existing Oracle home or in a standalone domain:

Using the Standard Installation Topology as a Starting Point

The standard installation topology is a flexible topology that you can use as a starting point in production environments.

The information in this guide helps you to create a standard installation topology for Oracle HTTP Server. If required, you can later extend the standard installation topology to create a secure and highly available production environment, see Next Steps After Configuring the Domain.

The standard installation topology represents a sample topology for this product. It is not the only topology that this product supports. See About the Standard Installation Topology in Planning an Installation of Oracle Fusion Middleware.

About the Standard Installation Topology for Oracle HTTP Server in a WebLogic Server Domain

Oracle HTTP Server can be installed in an existing Oracle home, collocated with a WebLogic Server domain

In this type of installation, the Oracle HTTP Server instance can be managed like any other elements of the WebLogic Server domain. Specifically, you can manage your Oracle HTTP Server instance from the Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control, the WLST Command line interface, and the Node Manager.

Figure 1-1 shows the standard Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure topology with an Oracle HTTP Server instance collocated in the same domain home. You can also use this topology to scale out to a high availability environment spanning multiple machines.

Figure 1-1 Topology of an Oracle HTTP Server Installation in a WebLogic Server Domain

Description of Figure 1-1 follows
Description of "Figure 1-1 Topology of an Oracle HTTP Server Installation in a WebLogic Server Domain"

For configuration instructions, see Configuring Oracle HTTP Server in a Collocated Domain

Understanding Elements in the Standard Installation Topology Illustration

The standard installation topology typically includes common elements.

Table 1-1 describes all elements of the topology illustration.

Table 1-1 Description of Elements in the Standard Installation Topology for Oracle HTTP Server

Element Description and Links to Additional Documentation
APPHOST A standard term used in Oracle documentation to refer to the machine that hosts the application tier.
DBHOST A standard term used in Oracle documentation to refer to the machine that hosts the database.
WebLogic Domain A logically related group of Java components (in this case, the Administration Server, Managed Servers, and other related software components).

For more information, see What Is an Oracle WebLogic Server Domain? in Understanding Oracle Fusion Middleware.

Administration Server The central control entity of a domain which maintains the configuration objects for that domain and distributes configuration changes to the Managed Servers.

For more information, see What Is the Administration Server? in Understanding Oracle Fusion Middleware.

Enterprise Manager The Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control is a primary tool used to manage a domain.

For more information, see Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control in Understanding Oracle Fusion Middleware.

Oracle HTTP Server The Oracle HTTP Server binaries and an Oracle HTTP Server instance.
Cluster A collection of multiple WebLogic Server instances running simultaneously and working together.

For more information, see Overview of Managed Servers and Managed Server Clusters in Understanding Oracle Fusion Middleware.

Machine A logical representation of the computer that hosts one or more WebLogic Server instances (servers). Machines are also the logical glue between the Managed Servers and the Node Manager. You must associate Managed Servers with a machine to use Node Manager to start or stop them.
Managed Server A host for your applications, application components, web services, and their associated resources.

For more information, see Overview of Managed Servers and Managed Server Clusters in Understanding Oracle Fusion Middleware.

Infrastructure A collection of services that include:
  • Metadata repository (MDS) containing metadata for Oracle Fusion Middleware components, such as the Oracle Application Developer Framework. For more information, see What Is the Metadata Repository? in Understanding Oracle Fusion Middleware.

  • Oracle Application Developer Framework (Oracle ADF)

  • Oracle Web Services Manager (OWSM)

About Full-JRF and Restricted-JRF Modes

You can configure a collocated Oracle HTTP Server to run in either Full-JRF or Restricted-JRF mode.

Table 1-2 provides a comparison of these two modes.

Table 1-2 Comparison of Full-JRF and Restricted-JRF Modes

Operational Mode Description Recommended Use Case

Full Domain (or Full-JRF)

Full-JRF mode is dependent on a database connection.

This operational mode is best if your domain is accessing upper stack features, such as Oracle SOA Suite or Oracle Web Services Manager.

Restricted-JRF

Restricted-JRF mode works without a database connection.

Users can still manage all products via the Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control, but they cannot use cross component wiring.

This operational mode is best if your domain only accesses Oracle Traffic Director and Oracle HTTP Server.

Note that migrating from Restricted-JRF to Full-JRF is not currently supported.

For a full description of what these two operational modes offer, see Domain Types in Administering Oracle HTTP Server.

About the Standard Installation Topology for Oracle HTTP Server in a Standalone Domain

Oracle HTTP Server can be installed in a standalone domain in its own Oracle home.

You can create a standalone Oracle HTTP Server domain dedicated to managing system components only. A standalone configuration resides in its own Oracle home, which you create during the installation process, which means that the standalone Oracle HTTP Server topology can be installed and configured without the Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure.

A standalone domain cannot be managed with Fusion Middleware Control. You can manage your standalone Oracle HTTP Server domain with the WLST command-line and other features available in a standalone domain.

**INTERNAL XREF ERROR** shows the standard Oracle HTTP Server instance in the Web tier.

For configuration instructions, see Configuring Oracle HTTP Server in a Standalone Domain

Table 1-3 describes the elements of this topology.

Table 1-3 Description of the Elements in the Oracle HTTP Server Standalone Installation Topology

Element Description and Links to Additional Documentation

WEBHOST

This a separate host, which the sends requests to a WebLogic Server domain.

Standalone Domain

For more information, see Standalone Domain in Administering Oracle HTTP Server.

Oracle HTTP Server

The Oracle HTTP Server instance, which is created and managed by the management tools available in the standalone domain.

Note:

For more information on standalone domains in general, see What Is a Standalone Domain? in Understanding Oracle Fusion Middleware.