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Oracle Property Manager Implementation Guide
Release 12.1
Part Number E13611-04
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Prerequisites and Optional Integration

This chapter describes the prerequisite and optional setups steps that you need to complete in other Oracle products before you can set up Oracle Property Manager for your organization.

This chapter covers the following topics:

Overview

You can set up Oracle Property Manager either as a standalone application or as part of a suite of Oracle Applications.

You should keep the following points in mind while completing the setup steps listed in this chapter.

Shared Data

The setup steps discussed here include those that are required for Oracle Property Manager but shared with other Oracle Applications. If you have already completed the procedures or defined the required information while implementing other Oracle Applications, you can skip those steps. Examples of such setup procedures include:

Effective Dates

Most setup windows have fields for effective dates. These fields specify the dates during which the item you are defining is active.

The From date is a required field. It is usually set to the system date by default. However, you can change the date, if required. The To date is usually optional. You can leave this field blank if you want the item you are defining to be active indefinitely.

When you want to make an item inactive, enter the appropriate date in the To field.

Setting Up Underlying Oracle Applications Technology

To set up the underlying Oracle Applications technology, you should complete the following setup steps.

Creating Application User Sign-ons and Responsibilities

Before you set up Oracle Property Manager, you must set up Oracle Application users and responsibilities.

Oracle Applications User Names and Passwords

Oracle Applications user names and passwords allow users to access Oracle Applications or Oracle Self-Service Applications. Application user names uniquely identify each Oracle Application user and provide a level of security.

For instructions and information regarding creating application user sign-ons and passwords, see Users Window, Oracle Applications System Administrator's Guide.

User Responsibilities

You can assign one or more responsibilities to a user sign-on. A responsibility is a level of authority in Oracle Applications that lets users access only those Oracle Applications functions and data appropriate to their roles in an organization. You can assign one or more responsibilities to a user. When a user logs in, one of two things occurs:

Oracle Property Manager provides the Property Manager and Property Manager Super User responsibilities. You can set up additional responsibilities, such as Lease Administrator and Facilities Manager, during the setup process.

For instructions and information regarding defining user responsibilities, see Defining a Responsibility, Oracle Applications System Administrator’s Guide.

Configuring Concurrent Managers

Concurrent programs, such as those for generating reports, are executed in the background without interrupting a user's online work.

You must set up and start the concurrent managers for each product group before you can use Oracle Applications products. System Administrators use concurrent managers to decide when to run such concurrent programs and what resources to allocate them.

Concurrent managers run a program based on:

The priority of a concurrent request is determined by the application user name, and is set by the System Administrator using the Concurrent: Priority user profile option.

For information and instructions on defining and setting up concurrent managers, see Setting Up and Starting Concurrent Managers, Oracle Applications System Administrator's Guide and Defining Concurrent Managers, Oracle Applications System Administrator's Guide.

Setup Steps in Related Products

Once you have set up the underlying Oracle Applications technology, you may need to perform some or all of the following setup steps in other Oracle products before setting up Oracle Property Manager.

Note: If you are implementing Oracle Property Manager as a standalone application and do not intend to implement other Oracle products, you can perform some of the steps described here through windows available in Oracle Property Manager. Notes are provided where this is possible.

Oracle General Ledger

This section describes the setup steps to be completed in Oracle General Ledger.

Chart of Accounts

The chart of accounts defines the account structure your organization uses to record transactions and maintain account balances.

You should consider your organizational structure and the dimensions of your business while setting up your chart of accounts. You can thus ensure that the chart of accounts accommodates and properly classifies information from all your financial information sources and fits the specific needs of your organization. For example, if your organization is a commercial real estate business, you may wish to specify location as an accounting segment. This would help you to map your expenses to specific locations and derive relevant business intelligence from data in your general ledger.

For information and instructions on defining a chart of accounts, see Defining Your Chart of Accounts, Oracle General Ledger Implementation Guide and Defining your Accounts Structure, Oracle General Ledger Implementation Guide.

Note: If you are not implementing Oracle General Ledger, you can use the Chart of Accounts window in Oracle Property Manager to define your chart of accounts.

Accounting Period Types

Accounting periods are periods that are grouped together to comprise your organization's fiscal year. Oracle General Ledger has predefined period types of Month, Quarter, and Year. You can also define your own period types of the desired length. You use period types to define the accounting calendar for your organization.

For information and instructions on defining accounting period types, see Defining Period Types, Oracle General Ledger Implementation Guide.

Note: If you are not implementing Oracle General Ledger, you can use the Period Types window in Oracle Property Manager to define your accounting period types.

Accounting Calendars

The accounting calendar defines your accounting periods and fiscal years in Oracle General Ledger as well as subledger applications such as Oracle Property Manager.

For information and instructions for defining accounting calendars, see Defining Calendars, Oracle General Ledger Implementation Guide.

Note: If you are not implementing Oracle General Ledger, you can use the Accounting Calendar window in Oracle Property Manager to define your accounting calendar.

Ledger

Within the Oracle E-Business Suite, a ledger identifies a company or fund that shares a common chart of accounts structure, calendar, and ledger currency. You must define at least one ledger before you can implement and use Oracle Property Manager.

For information and instructions on defining a ledger, see Defining a Ledger, Oracle General Ledger Implementation Guide.

Note: If you are not implementing Oracle General Ledger, you can use the Ledger window in Oracle Property Manager to define your ledger.

Subledger Accounting Options

You can define Subledger Accounting Options for primary and secondary ledgers. You can use Subledger Accounting Options to define how journal entries are generated for Oracle Property Manager transactions when users run the Create Accounting concurrent program. For example, on the Update Accounting Options page, you can, specify whether

For more information, see Oracle Subledger Accounting and Subledger Accounting Options Setup, Oracle Subledger Accounting Implementation Guide.

Ledger Profile and System Options

After you create a ledger, you must set the GL: Ledger Name profile option to indicate the ledger in use at the site, application, or responsibility level. For more information, see General Ledger Applications Profile Options, Oracle General Ledger Reference Guide.

You must also specify which ledger your Oracle Property Manager installation uses in the Ledger field of the Oracle Property Manager System Options page. For more information, see System Options in Oracle Property Manager.

Legal Entity

Within the Oracle E-Business Suite, a legal entity is an organization that represents a legal company for which users can prepare fiscal or tax reports. Legal entities own all legal documents. For information on creating legal entities, see Using Accounting Setup Manager, Oracle Financials Implementation Guide. Once you have created a legal entity in Oracle General Ledger, you can associate it with one or more operating units in Oracle HRMS. See Organizations.

In Oracle Property Manager, lease-related documents such as terms belong to a legal entity. When a lease is abstracted and a lease term created, a legal entity attribute is assigned to the term. For information on how legal entity information is derived, see Entering Payment Term Details, Oracle Property Manager User Guide and Entering Billing Term Details, Oracle Property Manager User Guide.

Currencies

You select a ledger currency while defining a ledger. The ledger currency used in Oracle Property Manager for all leases is the currency assigned to your ledger.

For Oracle Property Manager, you can also define a set of reporting currencies, which are currencies other than your predefined ledger currency. After you select your reporting currencies, you then select an appropriate Conversion Rate Type to associate with each currency in the Reporting Currencies window.

After you have defined reporting currencies and assigned a Conversion Rate Type to each currency, you can export payments to Oracle Payables, and bills to Oracle Receivables, in those currencies. You would want to do this if, for example, your company holds a lease on property in Mexico, but your company makes payments to the landlord in United States dollars (USD). The payment terms of the lease may be in Mexican Nuevo Pesos (MXN), but you would need to export the payment to Oracle Payables in USD.

The Conversion Rate Type defines the terms according to which the conversion from the ledger currency to the reporting currency is performed. Oracle Property Manager obtains the ledger currency for a lease from Oracle General Ledger, as defined in the profile and system options for the ledger. The values in the Currency Code and Conversion Rate Type fields correspond to the values in Oracle General Ledger.

Oracle Subledger Accounting

Oracle Property Manager predefines certain setups in Oracle Subledger Accounting. Predefined values provided by Oracle Property Manager include those for

You can optionally define your own setups in Oracle Subledger Accounting to overwrite those provided by Oracle Property Manager. However, you cannot modify the predefined data directly. Instead, you must copy the predefined data and make changes to the copy.

You can transfer normalization-related accounting information from Oracle Property Manager to Oracle Subledger Accounting. Oracle Subledger Accounting creates the appropriate journal entries and transfers them to Oracle General Ledger.

Run the following concurrent programs from the Property Manager Super User responsibility to update, validate, import, and export predefined setup data in Oracle Subledger Accounting:

This section details some setup steps that affect how Oracle Property Manager transaction data is transferred to Oracle General Ledger from Oracle Subledger Accounting. For a detailed discussion of setup steps in Oracle Subledger Accounting, see Accounting Methods Builder, Oracle Subledger Accounting Implementation Guide.

Journal Line Types

You set up journal line types for a particular event class. The journal line type determines the characteristics of the subledger journal entry lines. You can also set up conditions for the use of the journal line type. For example, the journal line type determines if a particular journal line is a debit or a credit. It also determines the account class and the balance type for journal lines associated with the journal line type.

Oracle Property Manager provides the following predefined journal line types:

You can create your own journal line type or modify a copy of the predefined ones. While creating or modifying a journal line type, you can specify whether summary or detailed journal entry information should be sent to Oracle General Ledger when users run the Create Accounting concurrent program. Select Detail to maintain the same level of detail as the subledger journal entry line. Select Summary to summarize subledger journal entry lines by Accounting Flexfield.

SLA: Disable Journal Import Profile Option

You can use the SLA: Disable Journal Import profile option to specify whether the Journal Import concurrent program should be submitted automatically when users run the Create Accounting concurrent program.

If you set the SLA: Disable Journal Import profile option to Yes, Oracle Subledger Accounting inserts entries into the GL_INTERFACE table, but does not submit the Journal Import request.

If you set the SLA: Disable Journal Import profile option to No, Oracle Subledger Accounting inserts entries into the GL_INTERFACE table and submits the Journal Import request.

For more information, see Profile Options and Profile Option Category Overview, Oracle Subledger Accounting Implementation Guide.

Related Topics

Subledger Accounting Options

Oracle HRMS

This section deals with the setup steps related to Oracle HRMS.

Employees

If you are using Oracle Property Manager to manage office space and allocate locations to employees, you must define employees before you can use Oracle Property Manager effectively.

You can use the People window in HRMS to enter and maintain basic personal information about your organization's employees and contractors. For more information and instructions on creating employees, see Entering a New Person, Managing People Using Oracle HRMS.

Note: If you do not have Oracle HRMS installed, use the People window in Oracle Property Manager. For more information on the People window, see Enter Person, Managing People Using Oracle HRMS.

Organizations

Organizations represent the legislative units under which your business operates. You can define a hierarchy of organizations to represent the structure of your company.

For more information on creating organizations, see Creating an Organization, Oracle HRMS Enterprise and Workforce Management Guide.

Once you have created the required organizations, you can classify one or more as operating units. In Oracle Property Manager, operating units are used to partition data. Users create all leases, agreements, contacts, locations, and space assignments for a specific operating unit.

Note: Before users can create or access information for operating units you must grant them the appropriate access using security profiles.

See Also: Organizations, Oracle Receivables User's Guide

Security Profiles

A security profile determines the information to which the holders of a particular responsibility have access. You can associate one or more operating units to a security profile. Once you assign a security profile to a responsibility using the MO: Security Profile profile option, all users who use the responsibility can access the operating units in the security profile.

For more information, see Security Profiles, Oracle HRMS Configuring, Reporting, and System Administration Guide.

MO: Default Operating Unit

You can use the MO: Default Operating Unit profile option to determine the default operating unit for a responsibility. When users log into Oracle Property Manager using that responsibility, the selected operating unit is displayed as the default value in windows (including Lease, Building, and Space Assignment) that allow users to select an operating unit.

If the security profile associated with the responsibility includes multiple operating units, users can override the default operating unit and select another. However, if the security profile contains a single operating unit, the Operating Unit field is display only.

Note: If the MO: Default Operating Unit profile option is set to an operating unit that is not included in the security profile associated with the MO: Security Profile profile option, no default operating unit is displayed for that responsibility.

For more information, see the Oracle Applications Multiple Organizations Implementation Guide.

Oracle Payables

This section deals with the setup steps to be completed in Oracle Payables.

Suppliers

You must set up suppliers if you intend to use Oracle Property Manager to manage expense leases. The owner of the property your organization intends to lease (the landlord) must be set up as a supplier before expense lease information can be entered in Oracle Property Manager.

For more information and instructions on creating suppliers, see Defining Suppliers, Oracle iSupplier Portal Implementation Guide.

Note: If you do not have Oracle Payables installed, use the Suppliers window in Oracle Property Manager.

Payment Terms

A payment term is a schedule used to determine the amount and due date of a payment. You can use payment terms to determine your scheduled payment as well as any discounts offered. For example, the payment term '2% 10, Net 30’ can let tenants take a two percent discount if they pay within 10 days. After 10 days, the entire balance (without discount) is due within 30 days of the invoice date.

You can define proxima payment terms for regular expenses (rent, for example) that occur on the same day each month. You can also create split payment terms for invoice installments that have different due dates.

You can create an unlimited number of payment terms. Payment terms have one or more payment terms lines, each of which creates one scheduled payment.

After you define your payment terms, you can select default payment terms that Oracle Payables automatically assigns to suppliers and supplier sites.

For information and instructions on setting up payment terms, see Payment Terms, Oracle Payables Implementation Guide.

Distribution Sets

Distribution sets are predefined groups of general ledger accounting codes that determine the credit accounts for payment amounts and the debit accounts for negative payment amounts. Once you have set up distribution sets, users can specify a distribution set instead of GL account information on non-normalized terms.

For information and instructions on creating distribution sets, see Distribution Sets, Oracle Payables Implementation Guide.

Oracle Receivables

This section discusses the setup steps to be completed in Oracle Receivables.

Accounting Rules

You can use accounting rules to specify revenue recognition schedules for imported and manually entered transactions. You can define an accounting rule in which revenue is recognized over a fixed or variable period. For example, you can define a fixed duration accounting rule with monthly revenue recognition for monthly rent paid over a period of 12 months.

You can define an unlimited number of accounting rules. For more information and instructions on defining accounting rules, see Accounting Rules, Oracle Receivables Implementation Guide.

Transaction Source

Transaction sources identify where your invoicing activity originates. The transaction source also controls invoice defaults and invoice numbering.

Transaction sources control the standard transaction type assigned to a transaction and determine whether Oracle Receivables automatically numbers your transactions and transaction batches.

With Oracle Property Manager, you must use the Property Manager Batch Source. However, you can modify it according to your requirements. You can also change the name of the Property Manager Batch Source.

For more information on transaction sources, see Transaction Batch Sources, Oracle Receivables Implementation Guide.

Transaction Types

You can use transaction types to specify default values for invoice printing, posting to the general ledger, and updating open receivable balances.

Oracle Property Manager does not support credit and debit memos. So, depending on your business needs, you may need to define several different types of invoices. For example, you may wish to create separate transaction types for regular rent, variable rent, and recoveries.

Transaction types also determine whether your transaction entries update your customers’ (tenants') balances and whether Oracle Receivables should post these transactions to your general ledger. For example, if you set the Accounting Option system option to None, no information is sent to Oracle Receivables. All information comes from the transaction itself. For more information on the Accounting Option system option, see System Options in Oracle Property Manager.

For more information and instructions on transaction types, see Transaction Types, Oracle Receivables Implementation Guide.

Grouping Rules

Grouping rules specify attributes that must be identical for lines to appear on the same transaction. You can define grouping rules that AutoInvoice will use to group revenue and credit transactions. For example, you can define grouping rules to group multiple billing terms (separate ones for base rent, rent increases, and so on) for the same location into a single transaction.

For more information and instructions on creating grouping rules, see Grouping Rules, Oracle Receivables Implementation Guide.

See also:

Invoice Grouping Rules

Payment Terms

You can define standard payment terms for your tenants (customers) to specify the due date and discount date for rent payment. Payment terms can include a discount percent for early payment and you can assign multiple discounts to each payment term line.

For more information and instructions on setting up payment terms in Oracle Receivables, see Payment Terms, Oracle Receivables Implementation Guide.

Salespersons

In Oracle Receivables, sales people are associated with orders, returns, invoices, commitments, and customers.

For more information on creating salespersons, see Salespersons, Oracle Receivables Implementation Guide.

Note: If you do not intend to install Oracle Receivables, use the Salesperson window in Oracle Property Manager to create salespersons.

Customer Profile Classes

You can create customer profile classes to categorize your customers based on credit information, payment terms, currency limits, and correspondence type. When you initially set up your customers, you assign each customer to a profile class.

For more information and instructions for creating customer profile classes, see Customer Profile Classes, Oracle Receivables Implementation Guide.

Customers

You must define customers if you intend to use Oracle Property Manager to administer revenue leases and subleases. The tenants to whom you intend to lease property must be set up as customers before lease information can be entered in Oracle Property Manager.

When you enter a new customer, you must enter the customer’s name, profile class, number (if automatic customer numbering is set to No), and address.

Important: When creating a new customer, you must create at least one Bill To Site.

For more information and instructions on creating customers, see Creating a Customer, Oracle Receivables User's Guide.

Note: Use the Customers window to create new customers if you do not intend to install Oracle Receivables.

Oracle E-Business Tax

This section discusses the essential setup steps to be completed in Oracle E-Business Tax. For an in-depth discussion of tax-related setup steps, see Setting Up Taxes and Tax Regimes, Oracle E-Business Tax User Guide.

Taxes

In Oracle E-Business Tax, a tax comprises rules for determining the taxable basis, tax statuses, tax rates, tax controls, and tax accounting. You define a tax for a tax regime. Once defined, the tax is available to all operating units that are associated with the tax regime.

For more information and instructions on creating taxes, see Setting Up Taxes, Oracle E-Business Tax User Guide.

Tax Rates

In Oracle E-Business Tax, tax rates are created for tax statuses. The tax rates you create appear in the Tax Input Classification or Tax Output Classification LOVs on the Term Details window. Users can thus associate the appropriate tax rates with lease terms.

For instructions on creating tax rates, see Setting Up Tax Rates and Tax Recovery Rates, Oracle E-Business Tax User Guide.

Oracle Projects

This section discusses the setup steps to be completed in Oracle Projects.

Expenditure Definition

In Oracle Projects, Expenditure Definition consists of setting up and defining expenditure and revenue categories, units, expenditure types, and implementing transaction control extension and auto-approval extension.

For more information and instructions on completing the Expenditure Definition steps, see Expenditure Definition, Oracle Projects Implementation Guide.

Projects and Tasks

A project is a unit of work that requires resources to produce measurable results. Projects can be broken down into one or more smaller tasks. You can charge costs to projects, generate and maintain project revenue, generate invoices, and track unbilled receivable and unearned revenue information for projects.

You can assign projects to a location in Oracle Property Manager. By linking locations to projects, your organization can track where project team members are located and the exact costs of space assignment.

For more information on creating projects, see Creating Projects, Oracle Projects Fundamentals.