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Oracle Solaris Administration: Oracle Solaris Zones, Oracle Solaris 10 Zones, and Resource Management     Oracle Solaris 11 Information Library
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Document Information


Part I Oracle Solaris Resource Management

1.  Introduction to Resource Management

2.  Projects and Tasks (Overview)

Project and Task Facilities

Project Identifiers

Determining a User's Default Project

Setting User Attributes With the useradd and usermod Commands

project Database

PAM Subsystem

Naming Services Configuration

Local /etc/project File Format

Project Configuration for NIS

Project Configuration for LDAP

Task Identifiers

Commands Used With Projects and Tasks

3.  Administering Projects and Tasks

4.  Extended Accounting (Overview)

5.  Administering Extended Accounting (Tasks)

6.  Resource Controls (Overview)

7.  Administering Resource Controls (Tasks)

8.  Fair Share Scheduler (Overview)

9.  Administering the Fair Share Scheduler (Tasks)

10.  Physical Memory Control Using the Resource Capping Daemon (Overview)

11.  Administering the Resource Capping Daemon (Tasks)

12.  Resource Pools (Overview)

13.  Creating and Administering Resource Pools (Tasks)

14.  Resource Management Configuration Example

Part II Oracle Solaris Zones

15.  Introduction to Oracle Solaris Zones

16.  Non-Global Zone Configuration (Overview)

17.  Planning and Configuring Non-Global Zones (Tasks)

18.  About Installing, Shutting Down, Halting, Uninstalling, and Cloning Non-Global Zones (Overview)

19.  Installing, Booting, Shutting Down, Halting, Uninstalling, and Cloning Non-Global Zones (Tasks)

20.  Non-Global Zone Login (Overview)

21.  Logging In to Non-Global Zones (Tasks)

22.  About Zone Migrations and the zonep2vchk Tool

23.  Migrating Oracle Solaris Systems and Migrating Non-Global Zones (Tasks)

24.  About Automatic Installation and Packages on an Oracle Solaris 11 System With Zones Installed

25.  Oracle Solaris Zones Administration (Overview)

26.  Administering Oracle Solaris Zones (Tasks)

27.  Configuring and Administering Immutable Zones

28.  Troubleshooting Miscellaneous Oracle Solaris Zones Problems

Part III Oracle Solaris 10 Zones

29.  Introduction to Oracle Solaris 10 Zones

30.  Assessing an Oracle Solaris 10 System and Creating an Archive

31.  (Optional) Migrating an Oracle Solaris 10 native Non-Global Zone Into an Oracle Solaris 10 Zone

32.  Configuring the solaris10 Branded Zone

33.  Installing the solaris10 Branded Zone

34.  Booting a Zone, Logging in, and Zone Migration



Project and Task Facilities

To optimize workload response, you must first be able to identify the workloads that are running on the system you are analyzing. This information can be difficult to obtain by using either a purely process-oriented or a user-oriented method alone. In the Oracle Solaris system, you have two additional facilities that can be used to separate and identify workloads: the project and the task. The project provides a network-wide administrative identifier for related work. The task collects a group of processes into a manageable entity that represents a workload component.

The controls specified in the project name service database are set on the process, task, and project. Since process and task controls are inherited across fork and settaskid system calls, all processes and tasks that are created within the project inherit these controls. For information on these system calls, see the fork(2) and settaskid(2) man pages.

Based on their project or task membership, running processes can be manipulated with standard Oracle Solaris commands. The extended accounting facility can report on both process usage and task usage, and tag each record with the governing project identifier. This process enables offline workload analysis to be correlated with online monitoring. The project identifier can be shared across multiple machines through the project name service database. Thus, the resource consumption of related workloads that run on (or span) multiple machines can ultimately be analyzed across all of the machines.