Document Information


Part I Introduction

1.  Overview

Java EE 6 Platform Highlights

Java EE Application Model

Java EE Containers

Container Services

Container Types

Web Services Support


SOAP Transport Protocol

WSDL Standard Format

Java EE Application Assembly and Deployment

Packaging Applications

Development Roles

Java EE Product Provider

Tool Provider

Application Component Provider

Enterprise Bean Developer

Web Component Developer

Application Client Developer

Application Assembler

Application Deployer and Administrator

Java EE 6 APIs

Enterprise JavaBeans Technology

Java Servlet Technology

JavaServer Faces Technology

JavaServer Pages Technology

JavaServer Pages Standard Tag Library

Java Persistence API

Java Transaction API

Java API for RESTful Web Services

Managed Beans

Contexts and Dependency Injection for the Java EE Platform (JSR 299)

Dependency Injection for Java (JSR 330)

Bean Validation

Java Message Service API

Java EE Connector Architecture

JavaMail API

Java Authorization Contract for Containers

Java Authentication Service Provider Interface for Containers

Java EE 6 APIs in the Java Platform, Standard Edition 6 and 7

Java Database Connectivity API

Java Naming and Directory Interface API

JavaBeans Activation Framework

Java API for XML Processing

Java Architecture for XML Binding

SOAP with Attachments API for Java

Java API for XML Web Services

Java Authentication and Authorization Service

GlassFish Server Tools

2.  Using the Tutorial Examples

Part II The Web Tier

3.  Getting Started with Web Applications

4.  JavaServer Faces Technology

5.  Introduction to Facelets

6.  Expression Language

7.  Using JavaServer Faces Technology in Web Pages

8.  Using Converters, Listeners, and Validators

9.  Developing with JavaServer Faces Technology

10.  JavaServer Faces Technology: Advanced Concepts

11.  Using Ajax with JavaServer Faces Technology

12.  Composite Components: Advanced Topics and Example

13.  Creating Custom UI Components and Other Custom Objects

14.  Configuring JavaServer Faces Applications

15.  Java Servlet Technology

16.  Uploading Files with Java Servlet Technology

17.  Internationalizing and Localizing Web Applications

Part III Web Services

18.  Introduction to Web Services

19.  Building Web Services with JAX-WS

20.  Building RESTful Web Services with JAX-RS

21.  JAX-RS: Advanced Topics and Example

Part IV Enterprise Beans

22.  Enterprise Beans

23.  Getting Started with Enterprise Beans

24.  Running the Enterprise Bean Examples

25.  A Message-Driven Bean Example

26.  Using the Embedded Enterprise Bean Container

27.  Using Asynchronous Method Invocation in Session Beans

Part V Contexts and Dependency Injection for the Java EE Platform

28.  Introduction to Contexts and Dependency Injection for the Java EE Platform

29.  Running the Basic Contexts and Dependency Injection Examples

30.  Contexts and Dependency Injection for the Java EE Platform: Advanced Topics

31.  Running the Advanced Contexts and Dependency Injection Examples

Part VI Persistence

32.  Introduction to the Java Persistence API

33.  Running the Persistence Examples

34.  The Java Persistence Query Language

35.  Using the Criteria API to Create Queries

36.  Creating and Using String-Based Criteria Queries

37.  Controlling Concurrent Access to Entity Data with Locking

38.  Using a Second-Level Cache with Java Persistence API Applications

Part VII Security

39.  Introduction to Security in the Java EE Platform

40.  Getting Started Securing Web Applications

41.  Getting Started Securing Enterprise Applications

42.  Java EE Security: Advanced Topics

Part VIII Java EE Supporting Technologies

43.  Introduction to Java EE Supporting Technologies

44.  Transactions

45.  Resources and Resource Adapters

46.  The Resource Adapter Example

47.  Java Message Service Concepts

48.  Java Message Service Examples

49.  Bean Validation: Advanced Topics

50.  Using Java EE Interceptors

Part IX Case Studies

51.  Duke's Bookstore Case Study Example

52.  Duke's Tutoring Case Study Example

53.  Duke's Forest Case Study Example



Distributed Multitiered Applications

The Java EE platform uses a distributed multitiered application model for enterprise applications. Application logic is divided into components according to function, and the application components that make up a Java EE application are installed on various machines, depending on the tier in the multitiered Java EE environment to which the application component belongs.

Figure 1-1 shows two multitiered Java EE applications divided into the tiers described in the following list. The Java EE application parts shown in Figure 1-1 are presented in Java EE Components.

  • Client-tier components run on the client machine.

  • Web-tier components run on the Java EE server.

  • Business-tier components run on the Java EE server.

  • Enterprise information system (EIS)-tier software runs on the EIS server.

Although a Java EE application can consist of all tiers shown in Figure 1-1, Java EE multitiered applications are generally considered to be three-tiered applications because they are distributed over three locations: client machines, the Java EE server machine, and the database or legacy machines at the back end. Three-tiered applications that run in this way extend the standard two-tiered client-and-server model by placing a multithreaded application server between the client application and back-end storage.

Figure 1-1 Multitiered Applications

Diagram of multitiered application structure, including client tier, web tier, business tier, and EIS tier.


Although other enterprise application models require platform-specific security measures in each application, the Java EE security environment enables security constraints to be defined at deployment time. The Java EE platform makes applications portable to a wide variety of security implementations by shielding application developers from the complexity of implementing security features.

The Java EE platform provides standard declarative access control rules that are defined by the developer and interpreted when the application is deployed on the server. Java EE also provides standard login mechanisms so application developers do not have to implement these mechanisms in their applications. The same application works in a variety of security environments without changing the source code.

Java EE Components

Java EE applications are made up of components. A Java EE component is a self-contained functional software unit that is assembled into a Java EE application with its related classes and files and that communicates with other components.

The Java EE specification defines the following Java EE components:

  • Application clients and applets are components that run on the client.

  • Java Servlet, JavaServer Faces, and JavaServer Pages (JSP) technology components are web components that run on the server.

  • Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) components (enterprise beans) are business components that run on the server.

Java EE components are written in the Java programming language and are compiled in the same way as any program in the language. The differences between Java EE components and “standard” Java classes are that Java EE components are assembled into a Java EE application, they are verified to be well formed and in compliance with the Java EE specification, and they are deployed to production, where they are run and managed by the Java EE server.

Java EE Clients

A Java EE client is usually either a web client or an application client.

Web Clients

A web client consists of two parts:

  • Dynamic web pages containing various types of markup language (HTML, XML, and so on), which are generated by web components running in the web tier

  • A web browser, which renders the pages received from the server

A web client is sometimes called a thin client. Thin clients usually do not query databases, execute complex business rules, or connect to legacy applications. When you use a thin client, such heavyweight operations are off-loaded to enterprise beans executing on the Java EE server, where they can leverage the security, speed, services, and reliability of Java EE server-side technologies.

Application Clients

An application client runs on a client machine and provides a way for users to handle tasks that require a richer user interface than can be provided by a markup language. An application client typically has a graphical user interface (GUI) created from the Swing or the Abstract Window Toolkit (AWT) API, but a command-line interface is certainly possible.

Application clients directly access enterprise beans running in the business tier. However, if application requirements warrant it, an application client can open an HTTP connection to establish communication with a servlet running in the web tier. Application clients written in languages other than Java can interact with Java EE servers, enabling the Java EE platform to interoperate with legacy systems, clients, and non-Java languages.


A web page received from the web tier can include an embedded applet. Written in the Java programming language, an applet is a small client application that executes in the Java virtual machine installed in the web browser. However, client systems will likely need the Java Plug-in and possibly a security policy file for the applet to successfully execute in the web browser.

Web components are the preferred API for creating a web client program, because no plug-ins or security policy files are needed on the client systems. Also, web components enable cleaner and more modular application design because they provide a way to separate applications programming from web page design. Personnel involved in web page design thus do not need to understand Java programming language syntax to do their jobs.

The JavaBeans Component Architecture

The server and client tiers might also include components based on the JavaBeans component architecture (JavaBeans components) to manage the data flow between the following:

  • An application client or applet and components running on the Java EE server

  • Server components and a database

JavaBeans components are not considered Java EE components by the Java EE specification.

JavaBeans components have properties and have get and set methods for accessing the properties. JavaBeans components used in this way are typically simple in design and implementation but should conform to the naming and design conventions outlined in the JavaBeans component architecture.

Java EE Server Communications

Figure 1-2 shows the various elements that can make up the client tier. The client communicates with the business tier running on the Java EE server either directly or, as in the case of a client running in a browser, by going through web pages or servlets running in the web tier.

Figure 1-2 Server Communication

Diagram of client-server communication. Application clients access the business tier directly. Browsers, web pages, and applets access the web tier.

Web Components

Java EE web components are either servlets or web pages created using JavaServer Faces technology and/or JSP technology (JSP pages). Servlets are Java programming language classes that dynamically process requests and construct responses. JSP pages are text-based documents that execute as servlets but allow a more natural approach to creating static content. JavaServer Faces technology builds on servlets and JSP technology and provides a user interface component framework for web applications.

Static HTML pages and applets are bundled with web components during application assembly but are not considered web components by the Java EE specification. Server-side utility classes can also be bundled with web components and, like HTML pages, are not considered web components.

As shown in Figure 1-3, the web tier, like the client tier, might include a JavaBeans component to manage the user input and send that input to enterprise beans running in the business tier for processing.

Figure 1-3 Web Tier and Java EE Applications

Diagram of client-server communication showing detail of JavaBeans components and web pages in the web tier.

Business Components

Business code, which is logic that solves or meets the needs of a particular business domain such as banking, retail, or finance, is handled by enterprise beans running in either the business tier or the web tier. Figure 1-4 shows how an enterprise bean receives data from client programs, processes it (if necessary), and sends it to the enterprise information system tier for storage. An enterprise bean also retrieves data from storage, processes it (if necessary), and sends it back to the client program.

Figure 1-4 Business and EIS Tiers

Diagram of client-server communication showing detail of entities, session beans, and message-driven beans in the business tier.

Enterprise Information System Tier

The enterprise information system tier handles EIS software and includes enterprise infrastructure systems, such as enterprise resource planning (ERP), mainframe transaction processing, database systems, and other legacy information systems. For example, Java EE application components might need access to enterprise information systems for database connectivity.