Document Information


Part I Introduction

1.  Overview

Java EE 6 Platform Highlights

Java EE Application Model

Distributed Multitiered Applications


Java EE Components

Java EE Clients

Web Clients

Application Clients


The JavaBeans Component Architecture

Java EE Server Communications

Web Components

Business Components

Enterprise Information System Tier

Java EE Containers

Container Services

Container Types

Web Services Support


SOAP Transport Protocol

WSDL Standard Format

Java EE Application Assembly and Deployment

Development Roles

Java EE Product Provider

Tool Provider

Application Component Provider

Enterprise Bean Developer

Web Component Developer

Application Client Developer

Application Assembler

Application Deployer and Administrator

Java EE 6 APIs

Enterprise JavaBeans Technology

Java Servlet Technology

JavaServer Faces Technology

JavaServer Pages Technology

JavaServer Pages Standard Tag Library

Java Persistence API

Java Transaction API

Java API for RESTful Web Services

Managed Beans

Contexts and Dependency Injection for the Java EE Platform (JSR 299)

Dependency Injection for Java (JSR 330)

Bean Validation

Java Message Service API

Java EE Connector Architecture

JavaMail API

Java Authorization Contract for Containers

Java Authentication Service Provider Interface for Containers

Java EE 6 APIs in the Java Platform, Standard Edition 6 and 7

Java Database Connectivity API

Java Naming and Directory Interface API

JavaBeans Activation Framework

Java API for XML Processing

Java Architecture for XML Binding

SOAP with Attachments API for Java

Java API for XML Web Services

Java Authentication and Authorization Service

GlassFish Server Tools

2.  Using the Tutorial Examples

Part II The Web Tier

3.  Getting Started with Web Applications

4.  JavaServer Faces Technology

5.  Introduction to Facelets

6.  Expression Language

7.  Using JavaServer Faces Technology in Web Pages

8.  Using Converters, Listeners, and Validators

9.  Developing with JavaServer Faces Technology

10.  JavaServer Faces Technology: Advanced Concepts

11.  Using Ajax with JavaServer Faces Technology

12.  Composite Components: Advanced Topics and Example

13.  Creating Custom UI Components and Other Custom Objects

14.  Configuring JavaServer Faces Applications

15.  Java Servlet Technology

16.  Uploading Files with Java Servlet Technology

17.  Internationalizing and Localizing Web Applications

Part III Web Services

18.  Introduction to Web Services

19.  Building Web Services with JAX-WS

20.  Building RESTful Web Services with JAX-RS

21.  JAX-RS: Advanced Topics and Example

Part IV Enterprise Beans

22.  Enterprise Beans

23.  Getting Started with Enterprise Beans

24.  Running the Enterprise Bean Examples

25.  A Message-Driven Bean Example

26.  Using the Embedded Enterprise Bean Container

27.  Using Asynchronous Method Invocation in Session Beans

Part V Contexts and Dependency Injection for the Java EE Platform

28.  Introduction to Contexts and Dependency Injection for the Java EE Platform

29.  Running the Basic Contexts and Dependency Injection Examples

30.  Contexts and Dependency Injection for the Java EE Platform: Advanced Topics

31.  Running the Advanced Contexts and Dependency Injection Examples

Part VI Persistence

32.  Introduction to the Java Persistence API

33.  Running the Persistence Examples

34.  The Java Persistence Query Language

35.  Using the Criteria API to Create Queries

36.  Creating and Using String-Based Criteria Queries

37.  Controlling Concurrent Access to Entity Data with Locking

38.  Using a Second-Level Cache with Java Persistence API Applications

Part VII Security

39.  Introduction to Security in the Java EE Platform

40.  Getting Started Securing Web Applications

41.  Getting Started Securing Enterprise Applications

42.  Java EE Security: Advanced Topics

Part VIII Java EE Supporting Technologies

43.  Introduction to Java EE Supporting Technologies

44.  Transactions

45.  Resources and Resource Adapters

46.  The Resource Adapter Example

47.  Java Message Service Concepts

48.  Java Message Service Examples

49.  Bean Validation: Advanced Topics

50.  Using Java EE Interceptors

Part IX Case Studies

51.  Duke's Bookstore Case Study Example

52.  Duke's Tutoring Case Study Example

53.  Duke's Forest Case Study Example



Packaging Applications

A Java EE application is delivered in a Java Archive (JAR) file, a Web Archive (WAR) file, or an Enterprise Archive (EAR) file. A WAR or EAR file is a standard JAR (.jar) file with a .war or .ear extension. Using JAR, WAR, and EAR files and modules makes it possible to assemble a number of different Java EE applications using some of the same components. No extra coding is needed; it is only a matter of assembling (or packaging) various Java EE modules into Java EE JAR, WAR, or EAR files.

An EAR file (see Figure 1-6) contains Java EE modules and, optionally, deployment descriptors. A deployment descriptor, an XML document with an .xml extension, describes the deployment settings of an application, a module, or a component. Because deployment descriptor information is declarative, it can be changed without the need to modify the source code. At runtime, the Java EE server reads the deployment descriptor and acts upon the application, module, or component accordingly.

Figure 1-6 EAR File Structure

Diagram of EAR file structure. META-INF and web, application client, EJB, and resource adapter modules are under the assembly root.

The two types of deployment descriptors are Java EE and runtime. A Java EE deployment descriptor is defined by a Java EE specification and can be used to configure deployment settings on any Java EE-compliant implementation. A runtime deployment descriptor is used to configure Java EE implementation-specific parameters. For example, the GlassFish Server runtime deployment descriptor contains such information as the context root of a web application, as well as GlassFish Server implementation-specific parameters, such as caching directives. The GlassFish Server runtime deployment descriptors are named glassfish-moduleType.xml and are located in the same META-INF directory as the Java EE deployment descriptor.

A Java EE module consists of one or more Java EE components for the same container type and, optionally, one component deployment descriptor of that type. An enterprise bean module deployment descriptor, for example, declares transaction attributes and security authorizations for an enterprise bean. A Java EE module can be deployed as a stand-alone module.

Java EE modules are of the following types:

  • EJB modules, which contain class files for enterprise beans and, optionally, an EJB deployment descriptor. EJB modules are packaged as JAR files with a .jar extension.

  • Web modules, which contain servlet class files, web files, supporting class files, image and HTML files, and, optionally, a web application deployment descriptor. Web modules are packaged as JAR files with a .war (web archive) extension.

  • Application client modules, which contain class files and, optionally, an application client deployment descriptor. Application client modules are packaged as JAR files with a .jar extension.

  • Resource adapter modules, which contain all Java interfaces, classes, native libraries, and, optionally, a resource adapter deployment descriptor. Together, these implement the Connector architecture (see Java EE Connector Architecture) for a particular EIS. Resource adapter modules are packaged as JAR files with an .rar (resource adapter archive) extension.