Document Information


Part I Introduction

1.  Overview

Java EE 6 Platform Highlights

Java EE Application Model

Distributed Multitiered Applications


Java EE Components

Java EE Clients

Web Clients

Application Clients


The JavaBeans Component Architecture

Java EE Server Communications

Web Components

Business Components

Enterprise Information System Tier

Java EE Containers

Container Services

Container Types

Web Services Support


SOAP Transport Protocol

WSDL Standard Format

Java EE Application Assembly and Deployment

Packaging Applications

Development Roles

Java EE Product Provider

Tool Provider

Application Component Provider

Enterprise Bean Developer

Web Component Developer

Application Client Developer

Application Assembler

Application Deployer and Administrator

Java EE 6 APIs

Enterprise JavaBeans Technology

Java Servlet Technology

JavaServer Faces Technology

JavaServer Pages Technology

JavaServer Pages Standard Tag Library

Java Persistence API

Java Transaction API

Java API for RESTful Web Services

Managed Beans

Contexts and Dependency Injection for the Java EE Platform (JSR 299)

Dependency Injection for Java (JSR 330)

Bean Validation

Java Message Service API

Java EE Connector Architecture

JavaMail API

Java Authorization Contract for Containers

Java Authentication Service Provider Interface for Containers

Java EE 6 APIs in the Java Platform, Standard Edition 6 and 7

Java Database Connectivity API

Java Naming and Directory Interface API

JavaBeans Activation Framework

Java API for XML Processing

Java Architecture for XML Binding

SOAP with Attachments API for Java

Java API for XML Web Services

Java Authentication and Authorization Service

2.  Using the Tutorial Examples

Part II The Web Tier

3.  Getting Started with Web Applications

4.  JavaServer Faces Technology

5.  Introduction to Facelets

6.  Expression Language

7.  Using JavaServer Faces Technology in Web Pages

8.  Using Converters, Listeners, and Validators

9.  Developing with JavaServer Faces Technology

10.  JavaServer Faces Technology: Advanced Concepts

11.  Using Ajax with JavaServer Faces Technology

12.  Composite Components: Advanced Topics and Example

13.  Creating Custom UI Components and Other Custom Objects

14.  Configuring JavaServer Faces Applications

15.  Java Servlet Technology

16.  Uploading Files with Java Servlet Technology

17.  Internationalizing and Localizing Web Applications

Part III Web Services

18.  Introduction to Web Services

19.  Building Web Services with JAX-WS

20.  Building RESTful Web Services with JAX-RS

21.  JAX-RS: Advanced Topics and Example

Part IV Enterprise Beans

22.  Enterprise Beans

23.  Getting Started with Enterprise Beans

24.  Running the Enterprise Bean Examples

25.  A Message-Driven Bean Example

26.  Using the Embedded Enterprise Bean Container

27.  Using Asynchronous Method Invocation in Session Beans

Part V Contexts and Dependency Injection for the Java EE Platform

28.  Introduction to Contexts and Dependency Injection for the Java EE Platform

29.  Running the Basic Contexts and Dependency Injection Examples

30.  Contexts and Dependency Injection for the Java EE Platform: Advanced Topics

31.  Running the Advanced Contexts and Dependency Injection Examples

Part VI Persistence

32.  Introduction to the Java Persistence API

33.  Running the Persistence Examples

34.  The Java Persistence Query Language

35.  Using the Criteria API to Create Queries

36.  Creating and Using String-Based Criteria Queries

37.  Controlling Concurrent Access to Entity Data with Locking

38.  Using a Second-Level Cache with Java Persistence API Applications

Part VII Security

39.  Introduction to Security in the Java EE Platform

40.  Getting Started Securing Web Applications

41.  Getting Started Securing Enterprise Applications

42.  Java EE Security: Advanced Topics

Part VIII Java EE Supporting Technologies

43.  Introduction to Java EE Supporting Technologies

44.  Transactions

45.  Resources and Resource Adapters

46.  The Resource Adapter Example

47.  Java Message Service Concepts

48.  Java Message Service Examples

49.  Bean Validation: Advanced Topics

50.  Using Java EE Interceptors

Part IX Case Studies

51.  Duke's Bookstore Case Study Example

52.  Duke's Tutoring Case Study Example

53.  Duke's Forest Case Study Example



GlassFish Server Tools

The GlassFish Server is a compliant implementation of the Java EE 6 platform. In addition to supporting all the APIs described in the previous sections, the GlassFish Server includes a number of Java EE tools that are not part of the Java EE 6 platform but are provided as a convenience to the developer.

This section briefly summarizes the tools that make up the GlassFish Server. Instructions for starting and stopping the GlassFish Server, starting the Administration Console, and starting and stopping the Java DB server are in Chapter 2, Using the Tutorial Examples.

The GlassFish Server contains the tools listed in Table 1-1. Basic usage information for many of the tools appears throughout the tutorial. For detailed information, see the online help in the GUI tools.

Table 1-1 GlassFish Server Tools



Administration Console

A web-based GUI GlassFish Server administration utility. Used to stop the GlassFish Server and to manage users, resources, and applications.


A command-line GlassFish Server administration utility. Used to start and stop the GlassFish Server and to manage users, resources, and applications.


A command-line tool that launches the application client container and invokes the client application packaged in the application client JAR file.


A command-line tool to extract schema information from a database, producing a schema file that the GlassFish Server can use for container-managed persistence.


A command-line tool to package the application client container libraries and JAR files.

Java DB database

A copy of the Java DB server.


A command-line tool to transform, or bind, a source XML schema to a set of JAXB content classes in the Java programming language.


A command-line tool to create a schema file for each namespace referenced in your Java classes.


A command-line tool to generate JAX-WS portable artifacts for a given WSDL file. After generation, these artifacts can be packaged in a WAR file with the WSDL and schema documents, along with the endpoint implementation, and then deployed.


A command-line tool to read a web service endpoint class and generate all the required JAX-WS portable artifacts for web service deployment and invocation.