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Booting and Shutting Down Oracle® Solaris 11.4 Systems

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Updated: August 2018
 
 

SPARC: Using the OpenBoot PROM

The boot PROM is used to boot a SPARC based system and to modify boot parameters such as the boot device or the default boot file or kernel. You also use the boot PROM if you want to run hardware diagnostics before bringing the system to a multiuser state.

For a complete list of PROM commands, see the eeprom(8) man page.

To access the boot PROM, bring the system to run level 0. The system then displays the ok prompt.

$ init 0
ok

The next sections show tasks you can perform after you have accessed the ok prompt.

Identifying the PROM Revision Number of a System

To display the PROM revision number, type the following command:

ok banner

Determining the Default Boot Device

To obtain information about the default boot device, type the following command:

ok printenv boot-device

If the boot device is local, the output format would be similar to the following example:

boot-device =  /pci@7c0/pci@0/pci@1/pci@0,2/LSILogic,sas@2/disk@0,0:a

If the boot device is network based, the output format would resemble the following example:

boot-device = /sbus@1f,0/SUNW,fas@e,8800000/sd@a,0:a \
/sbus@1f,0/SUNW,fas@e,8800000/sd@0,0:a disk net

How to Identify Devices on a System

Identifying the system's devices helps you determine the appropriate devices from which to boot. To view the probe commands that are available on your system, use the sifting probe command.

Before You Begin

Ensure that your role has the appropriate rights profiles to perform this procedure. See Using Rights Profiles to Administer Boot Features.

  1. Change the PROM auto-boot? value to false.
    ok setenv auto-boot? false
  2. Clear all system registers.
    ok reset-all
  3. Identify the devices on the system.
    ok probe-device

    Alternatively, you can also use the devalias command to identify the device aliases and the associated paths that might be connected to the system.

  4. (Optional) Restore the auto-boot?'s setting to true.
    ok setenv auto-boot? true
    auto-boot? =          true
  5. Boot the system to a multiuser state.
    ok reset-all
Example 13  Displaying IDE Device Information

The following example shows how to identify the devices connected to a system.

ok setenv auto-boot? false
auto-boot? =          false
ok reset-all
.
.
ok probe-ide
   Device 0  ( Primary Master )
         Removable ATAPI Model: MATSHITACD-RW  CW-8124

  Device 1  ( Primary Slave )
         Not Present

  Device 2  ( Secondary Master )
         Not Present

  Device 3  ( Secondary Slave )
         Not Present

ok setenv auto-boot? true
auto-boot? =          true

ok reset-all
Example 14  Displaying Device Aliases

This example shows a sample output of the devalias command.

ok devalias
ttya /pci@7c0/pci@0/pci@1/pci@0/isa@2/serial@0,3f8
nvram /virtual-devices/nvram@3
net3 /pci@7c0/pci@0/pci@2/network@0,1
net2 /pci@7c0/pci@0/pci@2/network@0
net1 /pci@780/pci@0/pci@1/network@0,1
net0 /pci@780/pci@0/pci@1/network@0
net /pci@780/pci@0/pci@1/network@0
ide /pci@7c0/pci@0/pci@1/pci@0/ide@8
cdrom /pci@7c0/pci@0/pci@1/pci@0/ide@8/cdrom@0,0:f
disk3 /pci@7c0/pci@0/pci@1/pci@0,2/LSILogic,sas@2/disk@3
disk2 /pci@7c0/pci@0/pci@1/pci@0,2/LSILogic,sas@2/disk@2
disk1 /pci@7c0/pci@0/pci@1/pci@0,2/LSILogic,sas@2/disk@1
disk0 /pci@7c0/pci@0/pci@1/pci@0,2/LSILogic,sas@2/disk@0
disk /pci@7c0/pci@0/pci@1/pci@0,2/LSILogic,sas@2/disk@0
scsi /pci@7c0/pci@0/pci@1/pci@0,2/LSILogic,sas@2
virtual-console /virtual-devices/console@1
name aliases

How to Change the Default Boot Device

Before You Begin

You might need to identify the devices on the system before you can change the default boot device to some other device. For information about identifying devices on the system, see How to Identify Devices on a System.

Ensure that your role has the appropriate rights profiles to perform this procedure. See Using Rights Profiles to Administer Boot Features.

  1. Change the value of the boot-device.
    ok setenv boot-device device[n]
    device[n]

    Identifies the boot-device value, such as disk or network. The n can be specified as a disk number. Use one of the probe commands if you need help identifying the disk number.

  2. Verify that the default boot device has been changed.
    ok printenv boot-device
  3. Save the new boot-device value.
    ok reset-all

    The new boot-device value is written to the PROM.

Example 15  Changing the Default Boot Device

In this example, the default boot device is set to disk.

ok setenv boot-device /pci@1f,4000/scsi@3/disk@1,0
boot-device =         /pci@1f,4000/scsi@3/disk@1,0
ok printenv boot-device
boot-device           /pci@1f,4000/scsi@3/disk@1,0
ok reset-all
Resetting ... 
.
Rebooting with command: boot disk1                                    
Boot device: /pci@1f,4000/scsi@3/disk@1,0  File and args:
Example 16  Setting the Boot Device to the Network

In this example, the default boot device is set to become network-based.

ok setenv boot-device net
boot-device =         net
ok printenv boot-device
boot-device           net                    disk
ok reset-all
.
host1 console login: