Go to main content

Managing Secure Shell Access in Oracle® Solaris 11.3

Exit Print View

Updated: June 2019
 
 

How to Log In to a Remote Host With Secure Shell

  1. Start a Secure Shell session.

    Type the ssh command, and specify the name of the remote host and your login.

    mySystem$ ssh myRemoteSys -l username
  2. If prompted, verify the authenticity of the remote host key.

    A prompt might appear that question the authenticity of the remote host:

    The authenticity of host 'myRemoteHost' can't be established....Are you sure you want to continue connecting(yes/no)? 

    This prompt is normal for initial connections to remote hosts.

    • If you cannot confirm the authenticity of the remote host, type no and contact your system administrator.
      Are you sure you want to continue connecting(yes/no)? no

      The administrator is responsible for updating the global /etc/ssh/ssh_known_hosts file. An updated ssh_known_hosts file prevents this prompt from appearing.

    • If you confirm the authenticity of the remote host, answer the prompt and continue to the next step.
      Are you sure you want to continue connecting(yes/no)? yes
  3. Authenticate yourself to Secure Shell.
    1. When prompted, type your passphrase.
      Enter passphrase for key '/home/username/.ssh/id_rsa': passphrase
    2. When prompted, type your account password.
      username@myRemoteSys's password: password
      Last login: Wed Sep  7 09:07:49 2016 from mySystem
      Oracle Corporation      SunOS 5.11  11.3     September 2016
      myRemoteSys$
  4. Conduct transactions on the remote host.

    The commands that you send are encrypted. Any responses that you receive are encrypted.

  5. Close the Secure Shell connection.

    When you are finished, type exit or use your usual method for exiting your shell.

    myRemoteSys$ exit
    myRemoteSys$ logout
    Connection to myRemoteSys closed
    mySystem$
Example 3  Displaying a Remote GUI in Secure Shell

In this example, jdoe is the initial user on both systems and is assigned the Software Installation rights profile. The default value of the X11Forwarding keyword is still yes, and the xauth package is installed on the remote system.

$ ssh -l jdoe -X myRemoteSys
jdoe@myRemoteSys's password: password
Last login: Wed Sep  7 09:07:49 2016 from myLocalHost
Oracle Corporation      SunOS 5.11 11.3       September 2016
myRemoteSys$ useful-app-with-GUI &