6 Securing Enterprise JavaBeans (EJBs)

Oracle WebLogic Server supports the Java EE architecture security model for securing Enterprise JavaBeans (EJBs), which includes support for declarative authorization (also referred to in this document as declarative security) and programmatic authorization (also referred to in this document as programmatic security).

Java EE Architecture Security Model

Enterprise tier and web tier applications are made up of components that are deployed into various containers. These components are combined to build a multitier enterprise application. Security for components is provided by their containers. A container provides two kinds of security: declarative and programmatic.

See Overview of Java EE Security in The Java EE Tutorial, Release 7 for complete details about the Java EE security architecture.

Declarative Security

The Java EE Tutorial, Release 7 states that declarative security expresses an application component's security requirements by using either deployment descriptors or annotations.

A deployment descriptor is an XML file that is external to the application and that expresses an application's security structure, including security roles, access control, and authentication requirements.

Annotations, also called metadata, are used to specify information about security within a class file. When the application is deployed, this information can be either used by or overridden by the application deployment descriptor. Annotations save you from having to write declarative information inside XML descriptors. Instead, you simply put annotations on the code, and the required information gets generated. For this tutorial, annotations are used for securing applications wherever possible.

Declarative Authorization Via Annotations

As of EJB 3.x, to make the deployer's task easier, the application developer can define security roles. Developers can specify security metadata annotations directly in the EJB bean class to identify the roles that are allowed to invoke all, or a subset, of the EJB's methods.

As stated in the Securing an Enterprise Bean Using Declarative Security section of the The Java EE Tutorial, Release 7, "Declarative security enables the application developer to specify which users are authorized to access which methods of the enterprise beans and to authenticate these users with basic, or user name/password, authentication. Frequently, the person who is developing an enterprise application is not the same person who is responsible for deploying the application. An application developer who uses declarative security to define method permissions and authentication mechanisms is passing along to the deployer a security view of the enterprise beans contained in the EJB JAR. When a security view is passed on to the deployer, he or she uses this information to define method permissions for security roles. If you don't define a security view, the deployer will have to determine what each business method does to determine which users are authorized to call each method."

At deployment time, the deployer then creates these security roles if they do not already exist and maps users to these roles using the WebLogic Server Administration Console to update the security realm. For details, see Manage Security Roles in the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console Online Help. The deployer can also map any security roles to users using the weblogic-ejb-jar.xml deployment descriptor.

Note:

Deployment descriptor elements always override their annotation counterparts. In the case of conflicts, the deployment descriptor value overrides the annotation value.

Programmatic Security

The Java EE Tutorial, Release 7 states that for an enterprise bean, code embedded in a business method that is used to access a caller's identity programmatically and that uses this information to make security decisions. Programmatic security is useful when declarative security alone is not sufficient to express the security model of an application. The API for programmatic security consists of methods of the EJBContext interface and the HttpServletRequest interface. These methods allow components to make business-logic decisions based on the security role of the caller or remote user.

In the section Accessing an Enterprise Bean Caller's Security Context, The Java EE Tutorial, Release 7 states that, in general, ssecurity management should be enforced by the container in a manner that is transparent to the enterprise bean's business methods. The security API described in this section should be used only in the less frequent situations in which the enterprise bean business methods need to access the security context information, such as when you want to restrict access to a particular time of day.

The javax.ejb.EJBContext interface provides two methods that allow the bean provider to access security information about the enterprise bean's caller:

  • getCallerPrincipal allows the enterprise bean methods to obtain the current caller principal's name. The methods might, for example, use the name as a key to information in a database.

  • isCallerInRoleallows the developer to code the security checks that cannot be easily defined using method permissions. Such a check might impose a role-based limit on a request, or it might depend on information stored in the database.

    The enterprise bean code can use the isCallerInRole method to test whether the current caller has been assigned to a given security role. Security roles are defined by the bean provider or the application assembler and are assigned by the deployer to principals or principal groups that exist in the operational environment.

Declarative Versus Programmatic Authorization

Programmatic security is used by security-aware applications when declarative security alone is not sufficient to express the security model of the application. When choosing the security model that works best for you, consider who is responsible for managing security in your organization. Developers are most familiar with the application components they build, but they might not necessarily be familiar with the deployment environment in which those components run. In addition, as security policies change, it is more economical to reconfigure security declaratively instead of rebuilding, retesting, and redeploying applications, which may be necessary when making programmatic security updates.

As described in Declarative Authorization Via Annotations, to make the deployer's task easier, the application developer can specify security metadata annotations directly in the EJB bean class to identify the roles that are allowed to invoke all, or a subset, of the EJB's methods. However, deployment descriptor elements always override their annotation counterparts, which gives the deployer final control.

Using Declarative Security With EJBs

You can implement declarative security using the security providers via the Administration Console, or by using Java Authorization Contract for Containers (JACC). You also use deployment descriptors and metadata annotations for implementing declarative security.

There are three ways to implement declarative security:

  1. Security providers via the WebLogic Server Administration Console, as described in Securing Resources Using Roles and Policies for Oracle WebLogic Server.

  2. Java Authorization Contract for Containers (JACC), as described in Using the Java Authorization Contract for Containers.

  3. Deployment descriptors and metadata annotations, which are discussed in this section.

Which of these three methods is used is defined by the JACC flags and the security model. (Security models are described in Options for Securing EJB and Web Application Resources in Securing Resources Using Roles and Policies for Oracle WebLogic Server)

Implementing Declarative Security Via Metadata Annotations

As of EJB 3.0, (see What Was New and Changed in EJB 3.0 in Developing Enterprise JavaBeans for Oracle WebLogic Server), you are no longer required to create the deployment descriptor files (such as ejb-jar.xml). You can now use metadata annotations in the bean file itself to configure metadata.

You can still use XML deployment descriptors in addition to, or instead of, the metadata annotations if you so choose.

Note:

Deployment descriptor elements always override their annotation counterparts. In the case of conflicts, the deployment descriptor value overrides the annotation value.

To use metadata annotations:

  1. Use the metadata annotations feature and create an annotated EJB bean file.

  2. At deployment time, the deployer must then create these security roles if they do not already exist and map users to these roles using the WebLogic Server Administration Console to update the security realm. See Manage Security Roles in the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console Online Help.

The annotations are part of the javax.security.annotation package. The following security-related annotations are available:

Security-Related Annotation Code Examples

The section Securing Access to the EJB in Developing Enterprise JavaBeans for Oracle WebLogic Server provides an example of a simple stateless session EJB that uses all of the security-related annotations.

The section Specifying Authorized Users by Declaring Security Roles in the Java EE 7 Tutorial also discusses how to use annotations to specify the method permissions for the methods of a bean class, with accompanying code examples.

Implementing Declarative Security Via Deployment Descriptors

To implement declarative security in EJBs you can use deployment descriptors (ejb-jar.xml and weblogic-ejb-jar.xml) to define the security requirements. Example 6-1 shows examples of how to use the ejb-jar.xml and weblogic-ejb-jar.xml deployment descriptors to map security role names to a security realm. The deployment descriptors map the application's logical security requirements to its runtime definitions. And at runtime, the EJB container uses the security definitions to enforce the requirements.

To configure security in the EJB deployment descriptors, perform the following steps (see Example 6-1):

  1. Use a text editor to create ejb-jar.xml and weblogic-ejb-jar.xml deployment descriptor files.
  2. In the ejb-jar.xml file, define the security role name, the EJB name, and the method name.

    Note:

    The proper syntax for a security role name is as defined for an Nmtoken in the Extensible Markup Language (XML) recommendation available on the Web at: http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-xml#NT-Nmtoken.

    When specifying security role names, observe the following conventions and restrictions:

    • Do not use blank spaces, commas, hyphens, or any characters in this comma-separated list: \t, < >, #, |, &, ~, ?, ( ), { }.

    • Security role names are case sensitive.

    • The suggested convention for security role names is that they be singular.

    For more information on configuring security in the ejb-jar.xml file, see the Enterprise JavaBeans Specification, Version 2.0 which is at this location on the Internet: http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/docs-135218.html.

  3. In the WebLogic-specific EJB deployment descriptor file, weblogic-ejb-jar.xml, define the security role name and link it to one or more principals (users or groups) in a security realm.

    For more information on configuring security in the weblogic-ejb-jar.xml file, see weblogic-ejb-jar.xml Deployment Descriptor Reference in Developing Enterprise JavaBeans, Version 2.1, for Oracle WebLogic Server.

Example 6-1 Using ejb-jar.xml and weblogic-ejb-jar.xml Files to Map Security Role Names to a Security Realm

ejb-jar.xml entries:
         ...
<assembly-descriptor>
  <security-role>
        <role-name>manger</role-name>
  </security-role>
  <security-role>
        <role-name>east</role-name>  
  </security-role>
  <method-permission>
        <role-name>manager</role-name>
        <role-name>east</role-name>
        <method>
          <ejb-name>accountsPayable</ejb-name>
          <method-name>getReceipts</method-name>
        </method>
  </method-permission>
         ...
</assembly-descriptor>
          ...
weblogic-ejb-jar.xml entries:
  <security-role-assignment>
      <role-name>manager</role-name>
      <principal-name>al</principal-name>
      <principal-name>george</principal-name>
      <principal-name>ralph</principal-name>
  </security-role-assignment>
     ...

EJB Security-Related Deployment Descriptors

WebLogic Server supports several deployment descriptor elements that are used in the ejb-jar.xml and weblogic-ejb-jar.xml files to define security requirements in EJBs.

ejb-jar.xml Deployment Descriptors

The following ejb-jar.xml deployment descriptor elements are used to define security requirements in WebLogic Server:

method

The method element is used to denote a method of an enterprise bean's home or component interface, or, in the case of a message-driven bean, the bean's onMessage method, or a set of methods.

The following table describes the elements you can define within an method element.

Table 6-1 method Element

Element Required/Optional Description
<description>

Optional

A text description of the method.

<ejb-name>

Required

Specifies the name of one of the enterprise beans declared in the ejb-jar.xml file.

<method-intf>

Optional

Allows you to distinguish between a method with the same signature that is multiply defined across both the home and component interfaces of the enterprise bean.

<method-name>

Required

Specifies a name of an enterprise bean method or the asterisk (*) character. The asterisk is used when the element denotes all the methods of an enterprise bean's component and home interfaces.

<method-params>

Optional

Contains a list of the fully-qualified Java type names of the method parameters.

Used Within

The method element is used within the method-permission element.

Example

For an example of how to use the method element, see Example 6-1.

method-permission

The method-permission element specifies that one or more security roles are allowed to invoke one or more enterprise bean methods. The method-permission element consists of an optional description, a list of security role names or an indicator to state that the method is unchecked for authorization, and a list of method elements.

The security roles used in the method-permission element must be defined in the security-role elements of the deployment descriptor, and the methods must be methods defined in the enterprise bean's component and/or home interfaces.

The following table describes the elements you can define within a method-permission element.

Table 6-2 method-permission Element

Element Required/Optional Description
<description>

Optional

A text description of this security constraint.

<role-name> or <unchecked>

Required

The role-name element or the unchecked element must be specified.

The role-name element contains the name of a security role. The name must conform to the lexical rules for an NMTOKEN.

The unchecked element specifies that a method is not checked for authorization by the container prior to invocation of the method.

<method> 

Required

Specifies a method of an enterprise bean's home or component interface, or, in the case of a message-driven bean, the bean's onMessage method, or a set of methods.

Used Within

The method-permission element is used within the assembly-descriptor element.

Example

For an example of how to use the method-permission element, see Example 6-1.

role-name

The role-name element contains the name of a security role. The name must conform to the lexical rules for an NMTOKEN.

Used Within

The role-name element is used within the method-permission, run-as, security-role, and security-role-ref elements.

Example

For an example of how to use the role-name element, see Example 6-1.

run-as

The run-as element specifies the run-as identity to be used for the execution of the enterprise bean. It contains an optional description, and the name of a security role.

Used Within

The run-as element is used within the security-identity element.

Example

For an example of how to use the run-as element, see Example 6-8.

security-identity

The security-identity element specifies whether the caller's security identity is to be used for the execution of the methods of the enterprise bean or whether a specific run-as identity is to be used. It contains an optional description and a specification of the security identity to be used.

The following table describes the elements you can define within an security-identity element.

Table 6-3 security-identity Element

Element Required/Optional Description
<description>

Optional

A text description of the security identity.

<use-caller-identity> or <run-as> 

Required

The use-caller-identity element or the run-as element must be specified.

The use-caller-identity element specifies that the caller's security identity be used as the security identity for the execution of the enterprise bean's methods.

The run-as element specifies the run-as identity to be used for the execution of the enterprise bean. It contains an optional description, and the name of a security role.

Used Within

The security-identity element is used within the entity, message-driven, and session elements.

Example

For an example of how to use the security-identity element, see Example 6-3 and Example 6-8.

security-role

The security-role element contains the definition of a security role. The definition consists of an optional description of the security role, and the security role name.

Used Within

The security-role element is used within the assembly-descriptor element.

Example

For an example of how to use the assembly-descriptor element, see Example 6-1.

security-role-ref

The security-role-ref element contains the declaration of a security role reference in the enterprise bean's code. The declaration consists of an optional description, the security role name used in the code, and an optional link to a security role. If the security role is not specified, the Deployer must choose an appropriate security role.

The value of the role-name element must be the String used as the parameter to the EJBContext.isCallerInRole(String roleName) method or the HttpServletRequest.isUserInRole(String role) method.

Used Within

The security-role-ref element is used within the entity and session elements.

Example

For an example of how to use the security-role-ref element, see Example 6-2.

Example 6-2 Security-role-ref Element Example

<!DOC<weblogic-ejb-jar xmlns="http://www.bea.com/ns/weblogic/90"
xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.bea.com/ns/weblogic/90
http://www.bea.com/ns/weblogic/90/weblogic-ejb-jar.xsd">
<ejb-jar>
 <enterprise-beans>
   ...
   <session>
     <ejb-name>SecuritySLEJB</ejb-name>
     <home>weblogic.ejb20.security.SecuritySLHome</home>
     <remote>weblogic.ejb20.security.SecuritySL</remote>
      <ejb-class>weblogic.ejb20.security.SecuritySLBean</ejb-class>
     <session-type>Stateless</session-type>
     <transaction-type>Container</transaction-type>
     <security-role-ref>
          <role-name>rolenamedifffromlink</role-name>
          <role-link>role121SL</role-link>
     </security-role-ref>
     <security-role-ref>
        <role-name>roleForRemotes</role-name>
        <role-link>roleForRemotes</role-link>
     </security-role-ref>
     <security-role-ref>
        <role-name>roleForLocalAndRemote</role-name>
        <role-link>roleForLocalAndRemote</role-link>
     </security-role-ref>
   </session>
    ...
 </enterprise-beans>
</ejb-jar>
unchecked

The unchecked element specifies that a method is not checked for authorization by the container prior to invocation of the method.

Used Within

The unchecked element is used within the method-permission element.

Example

For an example of how to use the unchecked element, see Example 6-1.

use-caller-identity

The use-caller-identity element specifies that the caller's security identity be used as the security identity for the execution of the enterprise bean's methods.

Used Within

The use-caller-identity element is used within the security-identity element.

Example

For an example of how to use the use-caller-identity element, see Example 6-3.

Example 6-3 use-caller-identity Element Example

<ejb-jar>
  <enterprise-beans>
    <session>
      <ejb-name>SecurityEJB</ejb-name>
      <home>weblogic.ejb20.SecuritySLHome</home>
      <remote>weblogic.ejb20.SecuritySL</remote>
      <local-home>
          weblogic.ejb20.SecurityLocalSLHome
      </local-home>
      <local>weblogic.ejb20.SecurityLocalSL</local>
      <ejb-class>weblogic.ejb20.SecuritySLBean</ejb-class>
      <session-type>Stateless</session-type>
      <transaction-type>Container</transaction-type>
    </session>
    <message-driven>
      <ejb-name>SecurityEJB</ejb-name>
      <ejb-class>weblogic.ejb20.SecuritySLBean</ejb-class>
      <transaction-type>Container</transaction-type>
      <security-identity>
         <use-caller-identity/>
      </security-identity>
    </message-driven>
  </enterprise-beans>
</ejb-jar>

weblogic-ejb-jar.xml Deployment Descriptors

The following weblogic-ejb-jar.xml deployment descriptor elements are used to define security requirements in WebLogic Server:

client-authentication

The client-authentication element specifies whether the EJB supports or requires client authentication.

The following table defines the possible settings.

Table 6-4 client-authentication Element

Setting Definition
none

Client authentication is not supported.

supported

Client authentication is supported, but not required.

required

Client authentication is required.

Example

For an example of how to use the client-authentication element, see Example 6-6.

client-cert-authentication

The client-cert-authentication element specifies whether the EJB supports or requires client certificate authentication at the transport level.

The following table defines the possible settings.

Table 6-5 client-cert-authentication Element

Setting Definition
none

Client certificate authentication is not supported.

supported

Client certificate authentication is supported, but not required.

required

Client certificate authentication is required.

Example

For an example of how to use the client-cert-authentication element, see Example 6-10.

confidentiality

The confidentiality element specifies the transport confidentiality requirements for the EJB. Using the confidentiality element ensures that the data is sent between the client and server in such a way as to prevent other entities from observing the contents.

The following table defines the possible settings.

Table 6-6 confidentiality Element

Setting Definition
none 

Confidentiality is not supported.

supported 

Confidentiality is supported, but not required.

required 

Confidentiality is required.

Example

For an example of how to use the confidentiality element, see Example 6-10 .

externally-defined

The externally-defined element lets you explicitly indicate that you want the security roles defined by the role-name element in the weblogic-ejb-jar.xml deployment descriptors to use the mappings specified in the WebLogic Server Administration Console. The element gives you the flexibility of not having to specify a specific security role mapping for each security role defined in the deployment descriptors for a particular Web application. Therefore, within the same security realm, deployment descriptors can be used to specify and modify security for some applications while the WebLogic Server Administration Console can be used to specify and modify security for others.

Note:

Starting in version 9.0, the default role mapping behavior is to create empty role mappings when none are specified. In version 8.1, EJB required that role mappings be defined in the weblogic-ejb-jar.xml descriptor or deployment would fail. With 9.0, EJB and WebApp behavior are consistent in creating empty role mappings.

For information on role mapping behavior and backward compatibility settings, see the section Understanding the Combined Role Mapping Enabled Setting in Securing Resources Using Roles and Policies for Oracle WebLogic Server. The role mapping behavior for a server depends on which security deployment model is selected on the WebLogic Server Administration Console. For information on security deployment models, see Options for Securing EJB and Web Application Resources in Securing Resources Using Roles and Policies for Oracle WebLogic Server.

When specifying security role names, observe the following conventions and restrictions:

  • The proper syntax for a security role name is as defined for an Nmtoken in the Extensible Markup Language (XML) recommendation available on the Web at: http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-xml#NT-Nmtoken.

  • Do not use blank spaces, commas, hyphens, or any characters in this comma-separated list: \t, < >, #, |, &, ~, ?, ( ), { }.

  • Security role names are case sensitive.

  • The suggested convention for security role names is that they be singular.

Example 6-4 and Example 6-5 show by comparison how to use the externally-defined element in the weblogic-ejb-jar.xml file. In Example 6-5, the specification of the "manager" externally-defined element in the weblogic-ejb-jar.xml means that for security to be correctly configured on the getReceipts method, the principals for manager will have to be created in the WebLogic Server Administration Console.

Example 6-4 Using the ejb-jar.xml and weblogic-ejb-jar.xml Deployment Descriptors to Map Security Roles in EJBs

ejb-jar.xml entries:
         ...
<assembly-descriptor>
  <security-role>
        <role-name>manger</role-name>
  </security-role>
  <security-role>
        <role-name>east</role-name>  
  </security-role>
  <method-permission>
        <role-name>manager</role-name>
        <role-name>east</role-name>
        <method>
          <ejb-name>accountsPayable</ejb-name>
          <method-name>getReceipts</method-name>
        </method>
  </method-permission>
         ...
</assembly-descriptor>
          ...
weblogic-ejb-jar.xml entries:
  <security-role-assignment>
      <role-name>manager</role-name>
      <principal-name>joe</principal-name>
      <principal-name>Bill</principal-name>
      <principal-name>Mary</principal-name>
      ...
</security-role-assignment>
   ... 

Example 6-5 Using the externally-defined Element in EJB Deployment Descriptors for Role Mapping

ejb-jar.xml entries:
         ...
<assembly-descriptor>
  <security-role>
        <role-name>manger</role-name>
  </security-role>
  <security-role>
        <role-name>east</role-name>  
  </security-role>
  <method-permission>
        <role-name>manager</role-name>
        <role-name>east</role-name>
        <method>
          <ejb-name>accountsPayable</ejb-name>
          <method-name>getReceipts</method-name>
        </method>
  </method-permission>
         ...
</assembly-descriptor>
          ...
weblogic-ejb-jar.xml entries:
  <security-role-assignment>
      <role-name>manager</role-name>
      <externally-defined/>
      ...
  </security-role-assignment>
   ... 

For more information on using the WebLogic Server Administration Console to configure security for EJBs, see Options for Securing EJB and Web Application Resources in Securing Resources Using Roles and Policies for Oracle WebLogic Server.

identity-assertion

The identity-assertion element specifies whether the EJB supports identity assertion.

The following table defines the possible settings.

Table 6-7 identity-assertion Element

Setting Definition
none 

Identity assertion is not supported

supported 

Identity assertion is supported, but not required.

required 

Identity assertion is required.

Used Within

The identity-assertion element is used with the iiop-security-descriptor element.

Example

For an example of how to the identity-assertion element, see Example 6-6.

iiop-security-descriptor

The iiop-security-descriptor element specifies security configuration parameters at the bean-level. These parameters determine the IIOP security information contained in the interoperable object reference (IOR).

Example

For an example of how to use the iiop-security-descriptor element, see Example 6-6.

Example 6-6 iiop-security-descriptor Element Example

<weblogic-enterprise-bean>
  <iiop-security-descriptor>
       <transport-requirements>
              <confidentiality>supported</confidentiality>
              <integrity>supported</integrity>
              <client-cert-authorization>
                  supported
                 </client-cert-authentication>
       </transport-requirements>
       <client-authentication>supported<client-authentication>
       <identity-assertion>supported</identity-assertion>
  </iiop-security-descriptor>
</weblogic-enterprise-bean>
integrity

The integrity element specifies the transport integrity requirements for the EJB. Using the integrity element ensures that the data is sent between the client and server in such a way that it cannot be changed in transit.

The following table defines the possible settings.

Table 6-8 integrity Element

Setting Definition
none 

Integrity is not supported.

supported 

Integrity is supported, but not required.

required 

Integrity is required.

Used Within

The integrity element is used within the transport-requirements element.

Example

For an example of how to use the integrity element, see Example 6-10.

principal-name

The principal-name element specifies the name of the principal in the WebLogic Server security realm that applies to role name specified in the security-role-assignment element. At least one principal is required in the security-role-assignment element. You may define more than one principal-name for each role name.

Note:

If you need to list a significant number of principals, consider specifying groups instead of users. There are performance issues if you specify too many users.

Used Within

The mk,?"{>L" -name element is used within the security-role-assignment element.

Example

For an example of how to use the principal-name element, see Example 6-1.

role-name

The role-name element identifies an application role name that the EJB provider placed in the companion ejb-jar.xml file. Subsequent principal-name elements in the stanza map WebLogic Server principals to the specified role-name.

Used Within

The role-name element is used within the security-role-assignment element.

Example

For an example of how to use the role-name element, see Example 6-1.

run-as-identity-principal

The run-as-identity-principal element specifies which security principal name is to be used as the run-as principal for a bean that has specified a security-identity run-as role-name in its ejb-jar deployment descriptor. For an explanation of how of run-as role-names to are mapped to run-as-identity-principals (or run-as-principal-names, see run-as-role-assignment.

Note:

Deprecated: The run-as-identity-principal element is deprecated in the WebLogic Server 8.1. Use the run-as-principal-name element instead.

Used Within

The run-as-identity-principal element is used within the run-as-role-assignment element.

Example

For an example of how to use the run-as-identity-principal element, see Example 6-7.

Example 6-7 run-as-identity-principal Element Example

ebj-jar.xml:
<ejb-jar>
 <enterprise-beans>
 <session>
   <ejb-name>Caller2EJB</ejb-name>
   <home>weblogic.ejb11.security.CallerBeanHome</home>
   <remote>weblogic.ejb11.security.CallerBeanRemote</remote>
   <ejb-class>weblogic.ejb11.security.CallerBean</ejb-class>
   <session-type>Stateful</session-type>
   <transaction-type>Container</transaction-type>
   <ejb-ref><ejb-ref-name>Callee2Bean</ejb-ref-name>
     <ejb-ref-type>Session</ejb-ref-type>
     <home>weblogic.ejb11.security.CalleeBeanHome</home>
     <remote>weblogic.ejb11.security.CalleeBeanRemote</remote>
   </ejb-ref>
   <security-role-ref>
     <role-name>users1</role-name>
     <role-link>users1</role-link>
   </security-role-ref>
   <security-identity>
    <run-as>
      <role-name>users2</role-name>
    </run-as>
   </security-identity>
  </session>
 </enterprise-beans>
</ejb-jar>
woblogic-ejb-jar.xml:
<weblogic-ejb-jar>
  <weblogic-enterprise-bean>
    <ejb-name>Caller2EJB</ejb-name> 
    <reference-descriptor>
     <ejb-reference-description>
       <ejb-ref-name>Callee2Bean</ejb-ref-name>
         <jndi-name>security.Callee2Bean</jndi-name>
     </ejb-reference-description>
    </reference-descriptor>
    <run-as-identity-principal>wsUser3</run-as-identity-principal>
  </weblogic-enterprise-bean>
  <security-role-assignment>
    <role-name>user</role-name>
    <principal-name>wsUser2</principal-name>
    <principal-name>wsUser3</principal-name>
    <principal-name>wsUser4</principal-name>
  </security-role-assignment>
</weblogic-ejb-jar>
run-as-principal-name

The run-as-principal-name element specifies which security principal name is to be used as the run-as principal for a bean that has specified a security-identity run-as role-name in its ejb-jar deployment descriptor. For an explanation of how the run-as role-names map to run-as-principal-names, see run-as-role-assignment.

Used Within

The run-as-principal-name element is used within the run-as-role-assignment element.

Example

For an example of how to use the run-as-principal-name element, see Example 6-8.

run-as-role-assignment

The run-as-role-assignment element is used to map a given security-identity run-as role-name that is specified in the ejb-jar.xml file to a run-as-principal-name specified in the weblogic-ejb-jar.xml file. The value of the run-as-principal-name element for a given role-name is scoped to all beans in the ejb-jar.xml file that use the specified role-name as their security-identity. The value of the run-as-principal-name element specified in weblogic-ejb-jar.xml file can be overridden at the individual bean level by specifying a run-as-principal-name element under that bean's weblogic-enterprise-bean element.

Note:

For a given bean, if there is no run-as-principal-name element specified in either a run-as-role-assignment element or in a bean specific run-as-principal-name element, then the EJB container will choose the first principal-name of a security user in the weblogic-enterprise-bean security-role-assignment element for the role-name and use that principal-name as the run-as-principal-name.

Example

For an example of how to use the run-as-role-assignment element, see Example 6-8.

Example 6-8 run-as-role-assignment Element Example

In the ejb-jar.xml file:
// Beans "A_EJB_with_runAs_role_X" and "B_EJB_with_runAs_role_X" 
// specify a security-identity run-as role-name "runAs_role_X". 
// Bean "C_EJB_with_runAs_role_Y" specifies a security-identity 
// run-as role-name "runAs_role_Y".
<ejb-jar>
  <enterprise-beans>
    <session>
      <ejb-name>SecurityEJB</ejb-name>
      <home>weblogic.ejb20.SecuritySLHome</home>
      <remote>weblogic.ejb20.SecuritySL</remote>
      <local-home>
          weblogic.ejb20.SecurityLocalSLHome
      </local-home>
      <local>weblogic.ejb20.SecurityLocalSL</local>
       <ejb-class>weblogic.ejb20.SecuritySLBean</ejb-class>
      <session-type>Stateless</session-type>
      <transaction-type>Container</transaction-type>
    </session>
    <message-driven>
      <ejb-name>SecurityEJB</ejb-name>
      <ejb-class>weblogic.ejb20.SecuritySLBean</ejb-class>
      <transaction-type>Container</transaction-type>
      <security-identity>
           <run-as>
                 <role-name>runAs_role_X</role-name>
           </run-as>
      </security-identity>
      <security-identity>
            <run-as>
                 <role-name>runAs_role_Y</role-name>
            </run-as>
      </security-identity>
    </message-driven>
  </enterprise-beans>
</ejb-jar>

weblogic-ejb-jar file:

<weblogic-ejb-jar>
   <weblogic-enterprise-bean>
     <ejb-name>A_EJB_with_runAs_role_X</ejb-name>
   </weblogic-enterprise-bean>
   <weblogic-enterprise-bean>
     <ejb-name>B_EJB_with_runAs_role_X</ejb-name>
     <run-as-principal-name>Joe</run-as-principal-name> 
   </weblogic-enterprise-bean>
   <weblogic-enterprise-bean>
     <ejb-name>C_EJB_with_runAs_role_Y</ejb-name>
   </weblogic-enterprise-bean>
   <security-role-assignment>
     <role-name>runAs_role_Y</role-name>
     <principal-name>Harry</principal-name>
     <principal-name>John</principal-name>
   </security-role-assignment>
   <run-as-role-assignment>
     <role-name>runAs_role_X</role-name>
     <run-as-principal-name>Fred</run-as-principal-name>
   </run-as-role-assignment>
</weblogic-ejb-jar>

Each of the three beans shown in Example 6-8 will choose a different principal name to run as.

  • A_EJB_with_runAs_role_X

    This bean's run-as role-name is runAs_role_X. The jar-scoped <run-as-role-assignment> mapping will be used to look up the name of the principal to use. The <run-as-role-assignment> mapping specifies that for <role-name> runAs_role_X we are to use <run-as-principal-name> Fred. Therefore, Fred is the principal name that will be used.

  • B_EJB_with_runAs_role_X

    This bean's run-as role-name is also runAs_role_X. This bean will not use the jar scoped <run-as-role-assignment> to look up the name of the principal to use because that value is overridden by this bean's <weblogic-enterprise-bean> <run-as-principal-name> value Joe. Therefore Joe is the principal name that will be used.

  • C_EJB_with_runAs_role_Y

    This bean's run-as role-name is runAs_role_Y. There is no explicit mapping of runAs_role_Y to a run-as principal name, that is, there is no jar scoped <run-as-role-assignment> for runAs_role_Y nor is there a bean scoped <run-as-principal-name> specified in this bean's <weblogic-enterprise-bean>. To determine the principal name to use, the <security-role-assignment> for <role-name> runAs_role_Y is examined. The first <principal-name> corresponding to a user that is not a Group is chosen. Therefore, Harry is the principal name that will be used.

security-permission

The security-permission element specifies a security permission that is associated with a Java EE Sandbox.

Example

For an example of how to use the security-permission element, see Example 6-9.

security-permission-spec

The security-permission-spec element specifies a single security permission based on the Security policy file syntax.

See the implementation of the security permission specification:

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/technotes/guides/security/PolicyFiles.html#FileSyntax

Note:

Disregard the optional codebase and signedBy clauses.

Used Within

The security-permission-spec element is used within the security-permission element.

Example

For an example of how to use the security-permission-spec element, see Example 6-9.

Example 6-9 security-permission-spec Element Example

<weblogic-ejb-jar>
  <security-permission>
     <description>Optional explanation goes here</description>
     <security-permission-spec>
<!
A single grant statement following the syntax of
http://xmlns.jcp.org/j2se/1.5.0/docs/guide/security/PolicyFiles.html#FileSyntax,
without the codebase and signedBy clauses, goes here. For example:
-->
      grant {
      permission java.net.SocketPermission *, resolve;
      };
     </security-permission-spec>
   </security-permission>
</weblogic-ejb-jar>

In Example 6-9, permission java.net.SocketPermission is the permission class name, "*" represents the target name, and resolve (resolve host/IP name service lookups) indicates the action.

security-role-assignment

The security-role-assignment element maps application roles in the ejb-jar.xml file to the names of security principals available in WebLogic Server.

Note:

For information on using the security-role-assignment element in a weblogic-application.xml deployment descriptor for an enterprise application, see Enterprise Application Deployment Descriptor Elements in Developing Applications for Oracle WebLogic Server.

Example

For an example of how to use the security-role-assignment element, see Example 6-1.

transport-requirements

The transport-requirements element defines the transport requirements for the EJB.

Used Within

The transport-requirements element is used within the iiop-security-descriptor element.

Example

For an example of how to use the transport-requirements element, see Example 6-10.

Example 6-10 transport-requirements Element Example

<weblogic-enterprise-bean>
  <iiop-security-descriptor>
       <transport-requirements>
              <confidentiality>supported</confidentiality>
              <integrity>supported</integrity>
              <client-cert-authorization>
                   supported 
              </client-cert-authentication>
</transport-requirements>
  </iiop-security-descriptor>
<weblogic-enterprise-bean>

Using Programmatic Security With EJBs

WebLogic Server supports the use of the javax.ejb.EJBContext.getCallerPrincipal() and the javax.ejb.EJBContext.isCallerInRole() methods to implement programmatic security in EJBs.

getCallerPrincipal

Use the getCallerPrincipal() method to determine the caller of the EJB. The javax.ejb.EJBContext.getCallerPrincipal() method returns a WLSUser Principal if one exists in the Subject of the calling user. In the case of multiple WLSUser Principals, the method returns the first in the ordering defined by the Subject.getPrincipals().iterator() method. If there are no WLSUser Principals, then the getCallerPrincipal() method returns the first non-WLSGroup Principal. If there are no Principals or all Principals are of type WLSGroup, this method returns weblogic.security.WLSPrincipals.getAnonymousUserPrincipal(). This behavior is similar to the semantics of weblogic.security.SubjectUtils.getUserPrincipal() except that SubjectUtils.getUserPrincipal() returns a null whereas EJBContext.getCallerPrincipal()returns WLSPrincipals.getAnonmyousUserPrincipal().

For more information about how to use the getCallerPrincipal() method, see http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javaee/tech/index.html.

isCallerInRole

The isCallerInRole() method is used to determine if the caller (the current user) has been assigned a security role that is authorized to perform actions on the WebLogic resources in that thread of execution. For example, the method javax.ejb.EJBContext.isCallerInRole("admin")will return true if the current user has admin privileges.

For more information about how to use the isCallerInRole() method, see http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javaee/tech/index.html.