1 Introduction to Upgrading Oracle HTTP Server to 12c (12.2.1.4.0)

Before you begin, review all introductory information to understand the standard upgrade topologies and upgrade paths for Oracle HTTP Server 12c (12.2.1.4.0)

About the Starting Points for an Oracle HTTP Server Upgrade

You can upgrade to Oracle HTTP Server 12c (12.2.1.4.0) from supported 11g and 12c releases.

Supported release starting points are:

  • Oracle HTTP Server 11g (11.1.1.9)

  • Oracle HTTP Server 12c (12.1.3.0, 12.2.1.2 and 12.2.1.3)

The upgrade procedures in this guide explain how to upgrade an existing Oracle HTTP Server 11g domain and an existing 12c domain to Oracle Fusion Middleware 12c (12.2.1.4.0).

About the Oracle HTTP Server Standard Topologies

The steps to upgrade Oracle HTTP Server to 12c (12.2.1.4.0) depend on the existing production topology (either 11g or a previous 12c release).

As a result, it is difficult to provide exact upgrade instructions for every possible Oracle HTTP Server installation. Therefore, this upgrade documentation provides instructions for upgrading several typical Oracle HTTP Server topologies. These typical topologies are referred to as standard upgrade topologies.

Your actual topology may vary, but the topologies described here provide an example that can be used as a guide to upgrade other similar Oracle HTTP Server topologies.

Note:

For additional information about the upgrade process and planning resources to ensure your upgrade is successful, see Preparing to Upgrade in Planning an Upgrade of Oracle Fusion Middleware.

If you are upgrading from a previous 12c release, the standard topology remains unchanged. If you are upgrading from 11g, refer to the following sections to upgrade the following specific topologies:

Fusion Middleware Infrastructure Upgrade Topology with Oracle HTTP Server

This topic contains the Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g Application Developer standard upgrade topology with Oracle HTTP Server and the resulting Oracle Fusion Middleware 12c Infrastructure topology as it appears after you complete the upgrade procedures in this guide.

Figure 1-1 Infrastructure Standard Upgrade Topology with Oracle HTTP Server

Description of Figure 1-1 follows
Description of "Figure 1-1 Infrastructure Standard Upgrade Topology with Oracle HTTP Server"

Most of the elements in Figure 1-1 are described in Table 1-1.

Table 1-1 Description of the Elements in the Infrastructure Standard Upgrade Topology with Oracle HTTP Server

Element Description and Links to Additional Documentation

11g Application Developer Topology with Oracle HTTP Server

This is the label for the left side of Figure 1-1. It shows a typical single-host topology created using the Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g Application Developer installer.

It consists of a single domain that contains a cluster of two managed servers and the Administration Server. It also has an optional file-based store or database with schemas.

Figure 1-1 also shows an Oracle HTTP Server instance as part of the 11g domain.

This document describes, step-by-step, how to upgrade this topology to an equivalent topology created by using the Oracle Fusion Middleware 12c Infrastructure distribution.

12c Infrastructure Standard Installation Topology with Oracle HTTP Server

This is the label for the right side of the figure. It shows a typical single-host topology created by using the Oracle Fusion Middleware 12c Infrastructure distribution.

Like the Application Developer 11g topology, it also consists of a single domain that contains a cluster of two managed servers and the Administration Server.

Figure 1-1 also shows an Oracle HTTP Server instance as part of the 12c domain.

Oracle HTTP Server associated with the domain

An Oracle HTTP Server 11g instance that is configured to be associated with the Oracle WebLogic Server domain. In Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g, system component instance, such as Oracle HTTP Server, are configured with an Oracle Universal Installer-based configuration wizard and are managed using Oracle Process Manager and Notification Server.

Oracle HTTP Server

Unlike the Oracle HTTP Server 11g instance in the left side of the diagram, the Oracle HTTP Server 12c instance shown in the 12c topology is configured as part of the domain using the Oracle Fusion Middleware Configuration Wizard. It is managed using Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control, the Oracle WebLogic Scripting Tool (WLST), and the Oracle WebLogic Server Node Manager software.

Oracle HTTP Server Standard Upgrade Topology for Standalone Agents not Associated with a WebLogic Domain

In 12c, a Standalone Oracle HTTP Server is not managed by or associated with an Oracle WebLogic Server domain. A standalone Oracle HTTP Server 12c topology is installed and configured without the Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure. A Managed Oracle HTTP Server, however, is associated with an existing Oracle WebLogic Server domain. For the standalone scenario, you install the Oracle HTTP Server software in its own Oracle home, and you configure the Oracle HTTP Server instance in its own standalone domain.

Note:

Figure 1-2 shows a standalone Oracle HTTP Server topology.

Figure 1-2 Standalone Oracle HTTP Server Upgrade Topology

Description of Figure 1-2 follows
Description of "Figure 1-2 Standalone Oracle HTTP Server Upgrade Topology "

Table 1-2 describe the elements of this topology

Table 1-2 Description of the Elements in the Oracle Fusion Middleware Standalone Oracle HTTP Server Upgrade Topology

Element Description and Links to Additional Documentation

WEBHOST

Standard term used in Oracle documentation thatrefers to the computer that hosts the Web tier.

Standalone Domain

A standalone domain is only created if you are upgrading from 11g to 12c. If you are upgrading from 12.1.2.0.0, 12.1.3.0.0, 12.2.1.0.0, 12.2.1.1.0, 12.2.1.2.0, and 12.2.1.3.0, then the standalone domain already exists and there is no need to create the standalone domain.

The standalone domain has a directory structure similar to an Oracle WebLogic domain, but it does not contain an Administration Server or Managed Servers. The Oracle WebLogic Server Node Manager and other tools allow you to manage the standalone Oracle HTTP Server instance.

See What Is a Standalone Domain? in Understanding Oracle Fusion Middleware.

Differences between Oracle HTTP Server 11g and 12c

There are a few key differences to be aware of before you upgrade your Oracle HTTP Server to this release of Oracle Fusion Middleware.

Table 1-3 lists the key differences between Oracle HTTP Server 11g and 12c.

Table 1-3 Differences between Oracle HTTP Server 11g and 12c

In Oracle HTTP Server 11g: In Oracle HTTP Server 12c:
Oracle HTTP Server instances are typically configured in a separate Oracle instance directory outside the 11g Middleware home. Oracle HTTP Server instances can be configured as part of an Oracle WebLogic Server domain, using the Oracle Fusion Middleware Configuration Wizard.
Oracle HTTP Server instances are managed using the Oracle Process Manager and the Notification Server (OPMN) management software. Optionally, the Oracle HTTP Server instances can be associated with the WebLogic domain. When configured as part of an Oracle Application Server Infrastructure domain, Oracle HTTP Server instances can be managed using Oracle Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control and the Oracle WebLogic Scripting Tool (WLST).

In Oracle Fusion Middleware 12c, the Node Manager agent is responsible for delegating and executing management requests to Oracle HTTP Server instances.

mod_osso is supported and included with Oracle HTTP Server 11g.

If you use mod_osso in 11g, it will be disabled after you upgrade, as it is not supported in 12c.

mod_osso is not supported or included with Oracle HTTP Server 12c.

Oracle WebGate is the recommended replacement. You can install WebGate with Oracle HTTP Server. For more information on configuring WebGate with Oracle HTTP Server, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Installing and Configuring Oracle HTTP Server.

For more information about the changes to the way system components, such as Oracle HTTP Server, are configured and managed in Oracle Fusion Middleware 12c, as well as other key changes for Oracle Fusion Middleware 12c, see the following:

About Upgrade Restrictions

If you are using two or more Oracle Fusion Middleware products of the same or different versions in a single, supported, Oracle Fusion Middleware configuration, you must consider the interoperability and compatibility factors before planning the upgrade.

Interoperability

In the context of Oracle Fusion Middleware products, interoperability is defined as the ability of two Oracle Fusion Middleware products or components of the same version (or release) to work together (interoperate) in a supported Oracle Fusion Middleware configuration. Specifically, interoperability applies when the first 4 digits of the release or version number are the same. For example, Oracle Fusion Middleware 12c (12.2.1.0) components are generally interoperable with other 12c (12.2.1.4.0) components.

Compatibility

In the context of Oracle Fusion Middleware products, compatibility is defined as the ability of two Oracle Fusion Middleware components of different versions (or releases) to interoperate.

For a list of products and features available in Oracle Fusion Middleware Release 12.2.1.4.0, see Products and Features Available in Oracle Fusion Middleware in Understanding Interoperability and Compatibility.

When performing the upgrade of your hardware or software, verify that your Oracle Fusion Middleware software is certified to support the new operating system or computer hardware. For more information, refer to the following resources:

How to use this Guide

The procedure to upgrade Oracle HTTP Server is determined by whether it's a standalone deployment or a managed deployment.

Depending upon the type of your deployment, navigate to one of the following parts of this guide:

Note:

Before you start your upgrade, make sure that you review the introductory topics and complete the required pre-upgrade tasks.

Determining whether Oracle HTTP Server is Standalone or Managed (Collocated)

Oracle HTTP Server is the web server component for Oracle Fusion Middleware. It provides a listener for Oracle WebLogic Server and the framework for hosting static pages, dynamic pages, and applications over the Web. If you configure Oracle HTTP Server in a WebLogic Server domain, it is called as the Managed Oracle HTTP Server because you can manage the Oracle HTTP Server instances like any other elements of the WebLogic Server domain using Enterprise Manager Fusion Middleware Control, or the WLST command-line interface, or the Node Manager. If you install the Oracle HTTP software in a separate Oracle home without installing the Oracle Fusion Middleware Infrastructure, it is called as the standalone mode.

To determine whether you are upgrading a managed or a standalone Oracle HTTP Server:

If you are an 11g user: Check for the registered property in the file ORACLE_INSTANCE/config/OPMN/opmn/instance.properties. If it is set to true, then the instance is registered. A managed Oracle HTTP Server is registered, if it is not registered then it is Standalone Oracle HTTP Server.

If you are a 12c user: Check the element extention-template-ref and its attribute name in the file DOMAIN_HOME/init-info/domain-info.xml. If you find an element with the name Oracle HTTP Server (Standalone), then it is a standalone Oracle HTTP Server. And if you find an element with name Oracle HTTP Server (Collocated), then it is collocated.