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Reference for Oracle Solaris Cluster 4.4

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Updated: August 2018
 
 

claccess (8CL)

Name

claccess - manage Oracle Solaris Cluster access policies for nodes

Synopsis

/usr/cluster/bin/claccess -V
/usr/cluster/bin/claccess [subcommand] -?
/usr/cluster/bin/claccess subcommand [options] -v [hostname[,…]]
/usr/cluster/bin/claccess allow -h hostname[,…]
/usr/cluster/bin/claccess allow-all 
/usr/cluster/bin/claccess deny -h hostname[,…]
/usr/cluster/bin/claccess deny-all 
/usr/cluster/bin/claccess list 
/usr/cluster/bin/claccess set -p protocol=authprotocol
/usr/cluster/bin/claccess show 

Description

The claccess command controls the network access policies for machines that attempt to access the cluster configuration. The claccess command has no short form.

The cluster maintains a list of machines that can access the cluster configuration. The cluster also stores the name of the authentication protocol that is used for these nodes to access the cluster configuration.

When a machine attempts to access the cluster configuration, for example when it asks to be added to the cluster configuration (see clnode(8CL)), the cluster checks this list to determine whether the node has access permission. If the node has permission, the node is authenticated and allowed access to the cluster configuration.

You can use the claccess command for the following tasks:

  • To allow any new machines to add themselves to the cluster configuration and remove themselves from the cluster configuration

  • To prevent any nodes from adding themselves to the cluster configuration and removing themselves from the cluster configuration

  • To control the authentication type to check

You can use this command only in the global zone.

The general form of the claccess command is as follows:

 claccess [subcommand] [options]

You can omit subcommand only if options specifies the –? option or the –V option.

Each option of this command has a long form and a short form. Both forms of each option are provided with the description of the option in the “OPTIONS” section of this man page.

SUBCOMMANDS

The following subcommands are supported:

allow

Allows the specified machine or machines to access the cluster configuration.

Users other than the root role require solaris.cluster.modify authorization to use this subcommand. See rbac(7).

See also the description of the deny and the allow-all subcommands.

allow-all

Allows all machines to add themselves to access the cluster configuration.

Users other than the root role require solaris.cluster.modify authorization to use this subcommand. See rbac(7).

See also the description of the deny-all and the allow subcommands.

deny

Prevents the specified machine or machines from accessing the cluster configuration.

Users other than the root role require solaris.cluster.modify authorization to use this subcommand. See rbac(7).

See also the description of the allow and the deny-all subcommands.

deny-all

Prevents all machines from accessing the cluster configuration.

No access for any node is the default setting after the cluster is configured the first time.

Users other than the root role require solaris.cluster.modify authorization to use this subcommand. See rbac(7).

See also the description of the allow-all and the deny subcommands.

list

Displays the names of the machines that have authorization to access the cluster configuration. To see the authentication protocol as well, use the show subcommand.

Users other than the root role require solaris.cluster.read authorization to use this subcommand. See rbac(7).

set

Sets the authentication protocol to the value that you specify with the –p option. By default, the system uses sys as the authentication protocol. See the –p option in “OPTIONS”.

Users other than the root role require solaris.cluster.modify authorization to use this subcommand. See rbac(7).

show

Displays the names of the machines that have permission to access the cluster configuration. Also displays the authentication protocol.

Users other than the root role require solaris.cluster.read authorization to use this subcommand. See rbac(7).

Options

The following options are supported:

–?
-–help

Displays help information. When you use this option, no other processing is performed.

You can specify this option without a subcommand or with a subcommand. If you specify this option without a subcommand, the list of subcommands of this command is displayed. If you specify this option with a subcommand, the usage options for the subcommand are displayed.

–h hostname
-–host=hostname
-–host hostname

Specifies the name of the node being granted or denied access.

–p protocol=authentication-protocol
-–authprotocol=authentication-protocol
-–authprotocol authentication-protocol

Specifies the authentication protocol that is used to check whether a machine has access to the cluster configuration.

Supported protocols are des and sys (or unix). The default authentication type is sys, which provides the least amount of secure authentication. For more information on adding and removing nodes, see Chapter 8, Administering Cluster Nodes in Administering an Oracle Solaris Cluster 4.4 Configuration. For more information on these authentication types, see Managing Authentication in Oracle Solaris 11.4.

–V
-–version

Displays the version of the command.

Do not specify this option with subcommands, operands, or other options. The subcommands, operands, or other options are ignored. The –V option displays only the version of the command. No other processing is performed.

–v
-–verbose

Displays verbose information to standard output (stdout).

Exit Status

If the command is successful for all specified operands, it returns zero (CL_NOERR). If an error occurs for an operand, the command processes the next operand in the operand list. The returned exit code always reflects the error that occurred first.

The following exit codes can be returned:

0 CL_NOERR

No error

The command that you issued completed successfully.

1 CL_ENOMEM

Not enough swap space

A cluster node ran out of swap memory or ran out of other operating system resources.

3 CL_EINVAL

Invalid argument

You typed the command incorrectly, or the syntax of the cluster configuration information that you supplied with the –i option was incorrect.

6 CL_EACCESS

Permission denied

The object that you specified is inaccessible. You might need the root role or authorization to issue the command. See the rbac(7) man page for more information.

18 CL_EINTERNAL

Internal error was encountered

An internal error indicates a software defect or other defect.

39 CL_EEXIST

Object exists

The device, device group, cluster interconnect component, node, cluster, resource, resource type, resource group, or private string that you specified already exists.

Examples

Example 1 Allow a New Host Access

The following claccess command allows a new host to access the cluster configuration.

# claccess allow -h phys-schost-1
Example 2 Set the Authentication Type

The following claccess command sets the current authentication type to des.

# claccess set -p protocol=des
Example 3 Deny Access to All Hosts

The following claccess command denies all hosts access to the cluster configuration.

# claccess deny-all

Attributes

See attributes(7) for descriptions of the following attributes:

ATTRIBUTE TYPE
ATTRIBUTE VALUE
Availability
ha-cluster/system/core
Interface Stability
Evolving

See Also

Intro(8CL), clnode(8CL), cluster(8CL)

Notes

The root role can run all forms of this command.

Any user can run this command with the following subcommands and options:

  • –? option

  • –V option

To run this command with other subcommands, users other than the root role require authorizations. See the following table.

Subcommand
Authorization
allow
solaris.cluster.modify
allow-all
solaris.cluster.modify
deny
solaris.cluster.modify
deny-all
solaris.cluster.modify
list
solaris.cluster.read
set
solaris.cluster.modify
show
solaris.cluster.read