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Oracle® OpenBoot 4.x Administration Guide

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Updated: June 2020
 
 

boot Command Overview


Note -  When booting a virtual machine that is configured to boot by default, you can usually type boot and you do not need to specify the boot device nor any arguments that are described in this section. For such situations, instead see Perform a Default Boot.

This is the boot command syntax:

{0} ok boot [device-specifier] [arguments]

Note -  Most commands (such as boot and test) that require a device name accept either a full device path name or a device alias. In this document, the term device-specifier indicates that either an appropriate device path name or a device alias is acceptable for such commands.
Name
Description
device-specifier
The name (full path name or alias) of the boot device. Typical values include:
  • cdrom (CD-ROM drive)

  • disk (hard disk)

  • net (Ethernet)

If device-specifier is not specified and if diagnostic-mode? returns false, boot uses the device specified by the boot-device configuration variable.
The term device-specifier denotes a string that is either a device path, or an alias that refers to a non-leaf node followed by additional node-name components.
arguments
The name of the program to be booted (for example, stand/diag) and any program arguments.
If arguments is not specified, boot uses the file specified by the boot-file configuration variable.
filename
The name of the program to be booted (for example, stand/diag). filename is relative to the root of the selected device and partition (if specified). If filename is not specified, the boot program uses the value specified in the boot-file parameter.
options
These options are specific to the OS, and might differ from virtual machine to virtual machine.

Because a device alias cannot be syntactically distinguished from the arguments, OpenBoot resolves this ambiguity as follows:

  • If the space-delimited word following boot on the command line begins with /, the word is a device-path and, thus, a device-specifier. Any text to the right of this device-specifier is included in arguments.

  • If the space-delimited word matches an existing device alias, the word is a device-specifier. Any text to the right of this device-specifier is included in arguments.

  • Otherwise, the appropriate default boot device is used, and any text to the right of boot is included in arguments.

Consequently, boot command lines have the following possible forms.

{0} ok boot

With this form, boot loads and executes the program specified by the default boot arguments from the default boot device.

{0} ok boot device-specifier

If boot has a single argument that either begins with the character / or is the name of a defined devalias, boot uses the argument as a device specifier. boot loads and executes the program specified by the default boot arguments from the specified device.

If boot has a single argument that neither begins with the character / nor is the name of a defined devalias, boot uses all of the remaining text as its arguments.

{0} ok boot arguments

boot loads and executes the program specified by the arguments from the default boot device.

{0} ok boot device-specifier arguments

If there are at least two space-delimited arguments, and if the first such argument begins with the character / or if it is the name of a defined devalias, boot uses the first argument as a device specifier and uses all of the remaining text as its arguments. boot loads and executes the program specified by the arguments from the specified device.

For all of the above cases, boot records the device that it uses in the bootpath property of the /chosen node. boot also records the arguments that it uses in the bootargs property of the /chosen node.

Device alias definitions vary from virtual machine to virtual machine. Use the devalias command (described in Create a Device Alias) to obtain the definitions of your virtual machine's aliases.

For a description of the boot sequence changes and instructions on how you can manage the boot pool by using the bootadm boot-pool, refer to the Oracle Solaris 11.3 documentation at https://docs.oracle.com/en/operating-systems/solaris.html

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Caution

Caution  -  The Verified Boot policy setting of enforce does not allow the boot process to proceed if the OpenBoot use-nvramrc? variable is set to true. You can directly set the use-nvramrc? variable with the setenv command, or the variable is automatically set to true when you use the nvalias command. If you set the use-nvramrc? variable to false, you will not be able to create device aliases with the nvalias command. For further details, refer to https://docs.oracle.com/cd/E37444_01/html/E37446/z40001291613819.html.


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