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Trusted Extensions Configuration and Administration

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Updated: March 2019
 
 

How to Troubleshoot Mount Failures in Trusted Extensions

Before You Begin

You must be in the zone at the label of the file system that you want to mount. You must be the root role.

  1. Verify that the file systems on the NFS server are shared.
  2. Check the security attributes of the NFS server.
    1. Use the tninfo or tncfg command to find the IP address of the server or a range of IP addresses that includes the NFS server.

      The address might be directly assigned, or indirectly assigned through a wildcard mechanism. The address can be in a labeled or unlabeled template.

    2. Check the label that the template assigns to the NFS server.

      The label must be consistent with the label at which you are trying to mount the files.

  3. Check the label of the current zone.

    If the label is higher than the label of the mounted file system, then you cannot write to the mount even if the remote file system is exported with read/write permissions. You can only write to the mounted file system at the label of the mount.

  4. To mount file systems from an NFS server that is running earlier versions of Trusted Solaris software, do the following:
    • For a Trusted Solaris 1 NFS server, use the vers=2 and proto=udp options to the mount command.
    • For a Trusted Solaris 2.5.1 NFS server, use the vers=2 and proto=udp options to the mount command.
    • For a Trusted Solaris 8 NFS server, use the vers=3 and proto=udp options to the mount command.

    To mount file systems from any of these servers, the server must be assigned to an unlabeled template.